Weekly photo challenge – Wanderlust #2

Weekly photo challenge – Wanderlust #2

 

A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step”  – Confucius

photography by vocabularyinchunks
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Wanderlust
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Weekly photo challenge – Wanderlust

Weekly photo challenge – Wanderlust

 

Travel makes one modest.  You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world”  – gustauve flaubert

photography by vocabularyinchunks
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Weekly photo challenge – Atop

Weekly photo challenge – Atop

 

“To see what others cannot… You must climb the mountain”   – Ron Akers

 

photography by vocabularyinchunks

 

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Weekly photo challenge – The road taken

Weekly photo challenge – The road taken

 

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,  I took the one less travelled by.  And that has made all the difference”   – Robert Frost

foresta.jpg

forest4.jpg

photography by vocabularyinchunks

Read the poem –  HERE  

Poem guide,  suitable to use in class – HERE

In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge The Road Taken
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Weekly photo challenge – Repurpose

Weekly photo challenge – Repurpose

 

“ A chair is still a chair even though there’s no one sitting there”     
-Unknown

repurpose

photography by vocabularyinchunks
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Weekly photo challenge – Graceful

Weekly photo challenge – Graceful

 

“ Gracefulness has been defined to be the outward expression of the inward harmony of the soul ”     
-William Hazlitt

graceful

 

photography by vocabularyinchunks

 

 

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Weekly photo challenge – Names

Weekly photo challenge – Names

 

“A brand is a reason to choose” 

– Cheryl Burgess

name-2.jpg.jpeg

name-1.jpg.jpeg

photography by vocabularyinchunks

 

Bridgestone Corporation (株式会社ブリヂストン, Kabushiki-gaisha Burijisuton?) (TYO: 5108, OTC Pink: BRDCY) is a multinational auto and truck parts manufacturer founded in 1931 by Shojiro Ishibashi (石橋正二郎, Ishibashi Shōjirō?) in the city of Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan. The name Bridgestone comes from a calque translation and transposition of ishibashi, meaning “stone bridge” in Japanese.

Read more about the company here :

In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Names
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Weekly photo challenge – Ambience (2)

Weekly photo challenge – Ambience (2)

 

“The human spirit needs places where nature has not been rearranged by the hand of man” 

– Unknown

ambience-2.jpg

photography by vocabularyinchunks

 

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Weekly photo challenge – Resilient

Weekly photo challenge – Resilient

 

“You never know how strong you are until being strong is the only choice you have ” 

– Bob Marley

resilient

photography by vocabularyinchunks

 

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Weekly photo challenge – Cherry on top

Weekly photo challenge – Cherry on top

Cherry on Top

photography by :  vocabulary in chunks
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Cherry on Top

the cherry on the cake (or on top)

A desirable feature perceived as the finishing touch to something that is already very good  : the car is faster than a Ferrari, but the cherry on the cake is the price 

Read  more at  Oxford Dictionaries

  

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Weekly photo challenge – Curve #2

Weekly photo challenge – Curve #2

 

Curve
“He is not worthy of the honeycomb that shuns the hive because the bees have stings.” William Shakespeare
…………………………
photography by :  vocabulary in chunks
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Curve

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Weekly photo challenge – Curve

Weekly photo challenge – Curve

Curve

photography by :  vocabulary in chunks
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Curve

Idioms

Ahead of the curve – Similar to ahead of the pack, ahead of the curve literally refers to your position on the statistical bell curve, where the top of the curve represents the median, average result. By being ahead of the curve you represent the top percentile of results that either has the advanced skills or understanding that sets you apart.
 
Curve ball – (USA) If something is a curve ball, it is deceptive.
 
Behind the curve – If you are behind the curve, you are behind or out of touch with current trends or developments. (‘Ahead of the curve’ iis the opposite). Read more at Finedictionary.com
….
 ……   

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Weekly photo challenge – Numbers (3)

Weekly photo challenge – Numbers (3)

Number (3_

photography by :  vocabulary in chunks

Weighing devices are among man’s most important inventions. The earliest civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Indus Valley had uniform systems of weights and measures. The history of commerce can be traced back to these systems. Balances were in use in Mesopotamia as early as 4000 BC. For modern man, weighing and measuring play an essential role in our daily lives. Shortly after birth we are weighed, and from that point on, our bodies, the food we eat and all the products we use are weighed and measured at some stage in their development.

Read more @ ISASC

  –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    –    

scale (noun) weighing instrument, early 15c.; earlier “pan of a balance” (late 14c.); earlier still “drinking cup” (c. 1200), from Old Norse skal “bowl, drinking cup,” in plural, “weighing scale” from a noun derivative of Proto-Germanic *skæla “split, divide” (source also of Old Norse skel “shell,” Old English scealu, Old Saxon skala “a bowl (to drink from),” Old High German scala, German Schale “a bowl, dish, cup,” Middle Dutch scale, Dutch schaal “drinking cup, bowl, shell, scale of a balance”), from PIE root *skel- (1) “to cut” (see scale (n.1)).

The connecting sense seems to be of half of a bivalve (“split”) shell used as a drinking cup or a pan for weighing. But according to Paulus Diaconus the “drinking cup” sense originated from a supposed custom of making goblets from skulls (see skull). Related: Scales. This, as a name for the zodiac constellation Libra, is attested in English from 1630s.

[Etymonline.com]
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Numbers
Weekly photo challenge – Numbers (2)

Weekly photo challenge – Numbers (2)

photography by :  vocabulary in chunks

Number Proverbs and Sayings :

Once bitten, twice shy. After an unpleasant experience, people are careful to avoid something similar.
One father is (worth) more than a hundred schoolmasters. A teacher cannot replace a father. A child is raised by a father and taught by a teacher.
One good turn deserves another. You should be helpful to someone who helps you.
Opportunity seldom knocks twice Don’t miss opportunities that come along.
One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. What is useless to one person could be valuable to another.
Two wrongs don’t make a right. It is wrong to harm someone because they have harmed you.
Opportunity seldom knocks twice.

Don’t miss opportunities that come along.

   
               source : Learn English Today
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Numbers
Weekly photo challenge – Numbers

Weekly photo challenge – Numbers

Number

photography by :  vocabulary in chunks

Number Idioms :

go fifty-fifty (on something)

  •     to divide the cost of something in half

    I decided to go fifty-fifty on a new camera with my friend.

it takes two to tango

  •     if a problem or an argument involve two people then both people are responsible for the problem

    It takes two to tango and my friend should not blame me for all of our problems.

nine times out of ten

  •     almost always

    Nine times out of ten a small computer problem can be easily fixed.

on cloud nine

  •     very happy about something

    My sister has been on cloud nine since she won the money in the contest.

split (something) fifty-fifty

  •     to split or divide something into two equal parts

    We split the profits from our business fifty-fifty.

look like a million dollars

  •     look very good

    My mother looked like a million dollars when she left the hospital.

source : Idiom connection
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Numbers

 

Weekly Photo Challenge – Abstract #3

Weekly Photo Challenge – Abstract #3

Abstract4

photography by : vocabulary in chunks

 “Abstract is from a Latin word meaning “pulled away, detached,” and the basic idea is of something detached from physical, or concrete, reality. It is frequently used of ideas, meaning that they don’t have a clear applicability to real life, and of art, meaning that it doesn’t pictorially represent reality.”

vocabulary.com

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge:  “Abstract”
EngVid-free English lesson videos –  Teaching English – Vocabulary chunks – Lexical Chunks – Studying Vocabulary
Weekly Photo Challenge – Abstract #2

Weekly Photo Challenge – Abstract #2

Abstract2

photography by : vocabulary in chunks

 “Abstract is from a Latin word meaning “pulled away, detached,” and the basic idea is of something detached from physical, or concrete, reality. It is frequently used of ideas, meaning that they don’t have a clear applicability to real life, and of art, meaning that it doesn’t pictorially represent reality.”

vocabulary.com

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge:  “Abstract”
Teaching English – Vocabulary chunks – Lexical Chunks – Studying Vocabulary
Weekly Photo Challenge – Abstract

Weekly Photo Challenge – Abstract

Abstract 1

photography by : vocabulary in chunks

 “Abstract is from a Latin word meaning “pulled away, detached,” and the basic idea is of something detached from physical, or concrete, reality. It is frequently used of ideas, meaning that they don’t have a clear applicability to real life, and of art, meaning that it doesn’t pictorially represent reality.”

vocabulary.com

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge:  “Abstract”
Teaching English – Vocabulary chunks – Lexical Chunks – Studying Vocabulary
Weekly Photo Challenge ||Half -Light #2

Weekly Photo Challenge ||Half -Light #2

high-light2

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photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
 For this week’s photo challenge we have to share  a photo inspired by a poem, verse, song lyric or story.  This is my entry for the Half-Light Photo Challenge 
 
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michigan speaking test – cambridge first for schools – esb b2
Weekly Photo Challenge ||Half -Light

Weekly Photo Challenge ||Half -Light

Half-Light

Half-Light

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
 For this week’s photo challenge we have to share  a photo inspired by a poem, verse, song lyric or story.  This is my entry for the Half-Light Photo Challenge 
 
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Visit Greece – Greek Food – Lexical Chunks with videos

Weekly Photo Challenge ||Life Imitates Art

Weekly Photo Challenge ||Life Imitates Art

Art 1


           

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In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge:  “Life imitates Art”
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Weekly Photo Challenge ||Vibrant

Weekly Photo Challenge ||Vibrant

Vibrant
           

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
 

Vibrant colors are bright.   Vibrant sounds are loud and resonant.   Vibrant people are ones you remember–they’re bright and full of personality.

Vibrant was originally intended to describe sounds.  Sound waves vibrate, and when they vibrate more rapidly, they sound brighter.  Singers and string instrument players increase this effect by shaking the notes they play through a technique called vibrato that increases the vibrancy of their sound.”  [Vocabulary.com]

Mnemonics (Memory Aids) for vibrant :   Vibrant and brilliant both sound similar and have the same meaning….bright, shining.” [Mnemonic Dictionary]

 
In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge:  “Vibrant”
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Weekly photo challenge || Trio

Weekly photo challenge || Trio

Trio2

vic

TRIO

Whether it’s birds, opera singers, aces, or golfers, you can use the word trio to refer to anything made up of three.

You can probably tell by tri that trio involves three of something. It’s often used to describe a musical arrangement featuring three vocal parts or three different instruments, or a musical group made up of three players, such as a jazz trio consisting of a piano player, a bass player, and a drummer. For those not musically inclined, the word can be used more broadly to refer to three of anything, such as a trio of friends.

Source : vocabulary.com

 

 In response to The Daily Post’s  weekly photo challenge : Trio

Weekly photo challenge || Change

Weekly photo challenge || Change

Change1 Change2

vic

change

Is it just not the same anymore? Then there must have been a change. The noun change can refer to any thing or state that is different from what it once was.

 [ source :  vocabulary.com  ]

 In response to The Daily Post’s  weekly photo challenge : Change

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Weekly photo challenge || Grid #2

Weekly photo challenge || Grid #2

Grid2

vic

grid

A grid is a network of intersecting parallel lines, whether real or imaginary. Most American streets are laid out in a grid pattern, meaning the streets intersect at right angles and form a pattern of squares when viewed from above.

You’ve probably seen a map grid, the uniform lines drawn on a map that allow you to pinpoint a particular location. Grid can also refer to a physical network of sorts, not necessarily made of straight or parallel lines. You may be familiar with the high voltage electrical cables that carry power throughout the country, known as the national grid. A gird can also be a device made up of intersecting metal bars that you use when grilling food.

 

 [ source :  vocabulary.com  ]

 In response to The Daily Post’s  weekly photo challenge : Grid

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Weekly photo challenge || Grid

Weekly photo challenge || Grid

vic

grid

A grid is a network of intersecting parallel lines, whether real or imaginary. Most American streets are laid out in a grid pattern, meaning the streets intersect at right angles and form a pattern of squares when viewed from above.

You’ve probably seen a map grid, the uniform lines drawn on a map that allow you to pinpoint a particular location. Grid can also refer to a physical network of sorts, not necessarily made of straight or parallel lines. You may be familiar with the high voltage electrical cables that carry power throughout the country, known as the national grid. A gird can also be a device made up of intersecting metal bars that you use when grilling food.

 

 [ source :  vocabulary.com  ]

 In response to The Daily Post’s  weekly photo challenge : Grid

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Weekly photo challenge || Monochromatic #2

Weekly photo challenge || Monochromatic #2

Mono2

vic

monochromatic

adj :  having or appearing to have only one color

If everything in your room is brown, your room is monochromatic — all of one color.

In physics, monochromatic describes light that has the same wavelength so it is one color. Broken into Greek roots, the word shows its meaning: monos means one, and khroma means color. Things that are truly monochromatic are rare — examine the green leaves of trees and you’ll see lots of different shades.

 [ source :  vocabulary.com  ]

 In response to The Daily Post’s  weekly photo challenge : Monochromatic

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Weekly photo challenge || Monochromatic

Weekly photo challenge || Monochromatic

Mono1

vic

monochromatic

adj :  having or appearing to have only one color

If everything in your room is pink, your room is monochromatic — all of one color.

In physics, monochromatic describes light that has the same wavelength so it is one color. Broken into Greek roots, the word shows its meaning: monos means one, and khroma means color. Things that are truly monochromatic are rare — examine the green leaves of trees and you’ll see lots of different shades.

 [ source :  vocabulary.com  ]

 In response to The Daily Post’s  weekly photo challenge : Monochromatic

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Weekly photo challenge || Connected #2

Weekly photo challenge || Connected #2

Honeycomb

vic

Definition of connected  :  adj :  joined or linked together  : 

 [ source :  vocabulary.com  ]

 In response to The Daily Post’s  weekly photo challenge : Connected

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Weekly photo challenge || Close up

Weekly photo challenge || Close up

Close up 1     Close up 2  a piece of honeycomb

vic

Idioms :

 none of your beeswax

(British & Australian informal) an impolite way of saying that you do not want someone to know about your private life   

‘So where the heck have you been?’ ‘None of your beeswax!’

be as busy as a bee

(old-fashionedalso be a busy bee (old-fashioned)  to be very busy or very active

She’s as busy as a bee, always going to meetings and organizing parties.

be the bee’s knees

(British & Australian informal) to be extremely good

Have you tried this double chocolate-chip ice cream? It’s the bee’s knees, it really is.

have a bee in your bonnet

to keep talking about something again and again because you think it is important, especially something that other people do not think is important (often + about )

She’s got a real bee in her bonnet about people keeping their dogs under control.

source : the free dictionary

 In response to The Daily Post’s  weekly photo challenge : “Close Up”

Weekly Photo Challenge ||Half and Half

Weekly Photo Challenge ||Half and Half

Half and Half 3

 Half and Half 2
           

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
 

half-and-half

n : a mixture of half one thing and half another thing
or  (Brewing) a drink consisting of equal parts of beer and stout, or equal parts of bitter and mild
adj :   of half one thing and half another thing
adv :  in two equal parts
 
source : The Free Dictionary
 

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Half and Half”

Weekly Photo Challenge ||Half and Half

Weekly Photo Challenge ||Half and Half

half and half
           

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks

half-and-half

n : a mixture of half one thing and half another thing
or  (Brewing) a drink consisting of equal parts of beer and stout, or equal parts of bitter and mild
adj :   of half one thing and half another thing
adv :  in two equal parts
 
source : The Free Dictionary
 

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Half and Half”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol #5

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol #5

Rooster
           

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Roosters are symbolic of aggressiveness and a warning of impending danger, it is also reflective of the shimmering aspects of personality.
 
Read more at Buzzle: Roosters
 

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Symbol”

Another interesting post on this symbol  : The Gallic Rooster

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol #4

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol #4

Blue Butterfly
           

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
A blue butterfly is often considered as a sign of life, as it is an adult, and is at the peak of its life. Butterflies are often regarded as a symbol of love, and so can be seen used in various cards and paintings. In many cultures, butterflies are used to symbolize rebirth.
 
Read more at Buzzle: Blue Butterfly
 

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Symbol”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol #3

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol #3

Eggs
           

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
A symbol of fertility, purity, and rebirth, presenting someone with eggs is considered lucky. A brown egg is associated with not just luck but also happiness. Besides, eggs are also used to encourage the growth of crops, protect cattle and young children from misfortune, and also as a means to ward off the evil eye. In England, a gift of a white Egg is considered lucky, but a brown Egg, not only brings luck, but happiness as well.
 
Read more at Buzzle: Eggs
 

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Symbol”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol #2

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol #2


            Horse Shoe

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
A well-known Euro-American symbol of luck is that of the horseshoe. It is often associated with the properties to protect an individual from evil, and is known to keep the devil away from the house that has a horseshoe on the doorway. A horseshoe pointing upwards stores good luck inside forever. However, there are a few who believe that hanging it upside down allows all of the good luck, protective powers and good fortune to shower upon you and your house.
 
Read more at Buzzle: The Horseshoe
 

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Symbol”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol

Weekly Photo Challenge || Symbol


             Olive Tree

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
The Olive Tree has a long history of symbolism, and there are a number of representations which an olive tree is linked to. It acts as a symbol for reward, victory, strength, purification, fruitfulness, and peace. In Greek mythology, the tree was considered sacred, and it was believed that the tree was formed from the quarrel between Athene, the Greek Goddess of Wisdom, and Poseidon, the God of Sea and Earthquake.
Read more at Buzzle: The Olive Tree

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Symbol”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Door

Weekly Photo Challenge || Door

Door 3            

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
“Door” Idioms and Proverbs 

A golden key can open any door

Prov. Sufficient money can accomplish anything.  Jill:  I’m amazed that Sally got into a good university;  her grades were so poor.   Jane: Well, she comes from a wealthy family, and a golden key can open any door.

When one door shuts, another opens

Prov. When you lose one opportunity, you often find a different one.   Jane: I just found out I’m failing two classes. I’ll never get intocollege with grades like this. Jill:   Well, maybe you’ll find something better than college.   When one door shuts, another opens.

Behind closed doors

in secret; away from observers, reporters, or intruders, usually in a closed room.  They held the meeting behind closed doors, as the law allowed.  Every important issue was decided behind closed doors.
 
(source : thefreedictionary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Doors”

Quote

Weekly Photo Challenge || Door

Door1             Door 2

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
Some interesting facts about doors :
 

  • Archeologists discovered what may be Europe’s oldest door while excavating a site in Zürich, Switzerland. Tree ring dating of the wood used to make the door puts its age at roughly 5,100 years old.
  • The largest doors in the world are purported to be the entrances to NASA’s Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. These doors are 456 feet (or 45 stories) tall and take 45 minutes to open or close.
  • Most deadbolts found on commercial and residential doors are pin tumbler locks. It’s thought that the Egyptians invented an early prototype of the modern pin tumbler about 4,000 years ago. However it didn’t catch on until locksmith Linus Yale, Jr. patented one that operated with a small, flat key in 1861.
  • Hero of Alexandria is credited with designing one of the earliest automatic doors, in the first century AD. The system of counterbalanced, steam-powered weights opened the temple doors when priests made burnt offerings at the alter.
(source : national geographic channel)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Doors”

Weekly Photo Challenge || All the colours of the rainbow

Weekly Photo Challenge || All the colours of the rainbow

ROY-G-BIV

photography by : vocabulary | in | chunks
RAINBOW :
An arc of spectral colors, usually identified as red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet, that appears in the sky opposite the sun as a result of the refractive dispersion of sunlight in drops of rain or mist.
 [Middle English, from Old English rēnboga : rēn, rain + boga, bow;]
(source : thefreedictionary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “ROY-G-BIV”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Vivid # 2

Weekly Photo Challenge || Vivid # 2

Vivid 2c   Vivid 2b   Vivid 2a

Vivid is an adjective that describes a bold and bright color, an intense feeling, or an image in your mind that is so clear you can almost touch it.

Sometimes you have a vivid dream that feels so real that even when you wake up, you can’t tell if the dream is really over. In that dream, perhaps there were flowers with deep, rich, and vivid colors that looked like they were painted. Vivid comes from the Latin vivere, which means “to live,” and vivid memories do seem to live on. (source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Vivid”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Vivid

Weekly Photo Challenge || Vivid

Vivid1

Vivid2

Vivid3

Vivid is an adjective that describes a bold and bright color, an intense feeling, or an image in your mind that is so clear you can almost touch it.

Sometimes you have a vivid dream that feels so real that even when you wake up, you can’t tell if the dream is really over. In that dream, perhaps there were flowers with deep, rich, and vivid colors that looked like they were painted. Vivid comes from the Latin vivere, which means “to live,” and vivid memories do seem to live on. (source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Vivid”

Weekly Photo Challenge || On the Way #2

Weekly Photo Challenge || On the Way #2

On my way home….

On my way 2

On my way 3

 On the way  Also, on one’s way

  • In the process of coming,  going, or  traveling ; also, about to come. For example, The mail plane is on the way, or  She is on her way out the door, or Winter is on the way.
  •  On the route of a journey,  as in I met him on the way to town

 (source : dictionary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “On the Way”

Weekly Photo Challenge || On the Way

Weekly Photo Challenge || On the Way

 

On my way to the forest….

On my way - Copy

 On the way  Also, on one’s way

  • In the process of coming,  going, or  traveling ; also, about to come. For example, The mail plane is on the way, or  She is on her way out the door, or Winter is on the way.
  •  On the route of a journey,  as in I met him on the way to town

 (source : dictionary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “On the Way”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Intricate

Weekly Photo Challenge || Intricate

Intricate1

 

Intricate things are complex and have many elements: they’re not simple. Think of the intricate wiring of a computer’s motherboard, or the intricate plot of a movie that you have a hard time following.

Anything intricate is complicated. Chess is a very intricate game that you could study your entire life and still not know everything about. The more details and parts something has, the more intricate it is. (source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Intricate”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Motion(less)

Weekly Photo Challenge || Motion(less)

Motion - Motionless

 

Motion is the way things get from place to place. The ball rolling down a hill is in motion, and as Isaac Newton once proved, it will remain in motion until it hits a wall or something else that makes it stop.

When motion is used as a noun, it describes movement, like the motion that propels a car from one end of the highway to another. When used as a verb, motion means to signal or direct. “A restaurant patron will motion to the server when he’s ready for the check.” Someone who is just “going through the motions” doesn’t have to move at all, because they’re just pretending. (source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Motion”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Early Bird

Weekly Photo Challenge || Early Bird

Early Bird 2   Early Bird 3  Early Bird 1

If someone calls you an early bird, it means that you tend to get up very early in the morning. It’s usually a compliment to be called an early bird.

Early birds are people with a natural habit of waking early, and often also going to bed before it gets too late. You can also call someone who arrives early to events, movies, the airport, or appointments as an early bird. Early bird comes from a seventeenth century English proverb, “The early bird catches the worm,” which means that people who are well prepared are usually the most successful.

(source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “The Early Bird”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Afloat

Weekly Photo Challenge || Afloat

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If something’s afloat, it’s drifting on the water. When you sail toy boats, you set them afloat  across a pond or lake. You can set something afloat, like an inner tube in a pool or a leaf on a stream, or you can struggle to stay afloat, as when the passengers of a capsized boat try to keep their heads above water. In either case, being afloat means floating on the surface. The Old English word is aflote, from a Germanic root word. (source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Afloat.”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Blur # 2

Weekly Photo Challenge || Blur # 2

Blur 2

To blur is to make or become unfocused and fuzzy. Crying hard can cause your vision to blur until you wipe your tears away. Heavy smog or early morning fog can blur your view of the city, and two candidates’ similar views can blur the differences between their political parties. In both cases, things become indistinct and hazy. You can also call the haze itself a blur: “The whole day was just a blur after the exciting news I got in the morning.” In the 16th century, blur meant “smear on the surface of writing.” (source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Blur.”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Blur

Weekly Photo Challenge || Blur

Blur 1

To blur is to make or become unfocused and fuzzy. Crying hard can cause your vision to blur until you wipe your tears away. Heavy smog or early morning fog can blur your view of the city, and two candidates’ similar views can blur the differences between their political parties. In both cases, things become indistinct and hazy. You can also call the haze itself a blur: “The whole day was just a blur after the exciting news I got in the morning.” In the 16th century, blur meant “smear on the surface of writing.” (source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Blur.”

Weekly Photo Challenge || Ephemeral #3

Weekly Photo Challenge || Ephemeral #3

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Ephemeral (ə-FEM-ər-əl) was originally a medical term with the specific meaning “lasting only one day,” as a fever or sickness (Hemera means “day” in Greek.) The word became more general, coming to mean “lasting a short time,” covering the life spans of plants or insects and then eventually anything that is fleeting or transitory. A related word is the plural noun ephemera, meaning “things that are meant to last for only a short time.” Posters for a rock concert are often ephemera, unless the band is so famous that they get saved and sold on eBay. (source : vocabulary.com)
In response to The Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge:   Ephemeral
Weekly Photo Challenge || Ephemeral #2

Weekly Photo Challenge || Ephemeral #2

Ephemeral2a

Ephemeral (ə-FEM-ər-əl) was originally a medical term with the specific meaning “lasting only one day,” as a fever or sickness (Hemera means “day” in Greek.) The word became more general, coming to mean “lasting a short time,” covering the life spans of plants or insects and then eventually anything that is fleeting or transitory. A related word is the plural noun ephemera, meaning “things that are meant to last for only a short time.” Posters for a rock concert are often ephemera, unless the band is so famous that they get saved and sold on eBay. (source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge:   Ephemeral

Weekly Photo Challenge || Ephemeral #1

Weekly Photo Challenge || Ephemeral #1

Ephemeral 1

Ephemeral2

Ephemeral3

Ephemeral (ə-FEM-ər-əl) was originally a medical term with the specific meaning “lasting only one day,” as a fever or sickness (Hemera means “day” in Greek.) The word became more general, coming to mean “lasting a short time,” covering the life spans of plants or insects and then eventually anything that is fleeting or transitory. A related word is the plural noun ephemera, meaning “things that are meant to last for only a short time.” Posters for a rock concert are often ephemera, unless the band is so famous that they get saved and sold on eBay. (source : vocabulary.com)

In response to The Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge:   Ephemeral