Dive into the oven

Dive into the oven

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Shotis puri is a traditional Georgian bread, usually served with every meal. Baking the bread, however, can get a little extreme. For a new baker interested in venturing into the world of shotis puri, be prepared to dive headfirst … literally. The bread is baked in a tonir—a deep, clay oven onto which the unleavened dough is stuck. After the bread has been baked, bakers must dive headfirst into the hot, hot oven to retrieve their goods. No one knows the process better than Skhirtladze Davit. For the past 16 years, he’s been enduring the heat, all for the love of bread.

Vocabulary Chunks to learn from video :

  • A bread maker
  • In the making of this video
  • As you can probably gather
  • Armenia
  • Not your average bread maker
  • Bread oven
  • It translates to bread
  • It is essential
  • Turned up to the highest level
  • A salt based liquid
  • As close to the fire
  • As if diving into
  • Is just a part of the job
  • Intense enough
  • The end result
  • With a salty twist
  • That is eaten on special occasions
This is much more fun

This is much more fun

 [Great Big Story]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video  :

  • An Icelandic baker
  • An unconventional oven
  • By burying it underground
  • It is heated for 24 hours by nearby hot springs
  • On the surface
  • We could put it in the oven
  • This is much more fun
  • A volcanic region
  • 30 Active volcanoes
  • Boiling hot water
  • He uses them to his advantage
  • It dates back a hundred of years
  • We use a thermometer to check the heat
  • Our biggest challenge is rain

 

Every generation needs to pass on something

Every generation needs to pass on something

 [Great Big Story]

In a remote village in Guizhou Province, China, generations of artisans have been making handmade suits embroidered with tin. This is the only place in the world where this type of embroidery, called Miao embroidery, is done. After 500 years of tradition, the practice is disappearing. Long Nv San Jiu, a fourth-generation tin embroiderer, says she hopes to teach others this fine craft before it is lost to history forever.