Play outside

Play outside

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letthechildrenplay.net
Play Outside! is an ever expanding data base of  unique outdoor play and learning resources, tips, tools, blogs and ideas gathered together from around the blogosphere.
Whether you are a preschool teacher, parent, grandparent or caregiver you will find everything from sand play and gardening ideas to building and creative experiences – and so much more in between.  READ MORE
To make your search even simpler all the ideas gathered together in the Play Outside! database are easily searchable according to the type of play, the type of play space, the type of play material or the age range of the child.  To begin your search, click here.
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Horse of the woods

Horse of the woods

 

 
[Visit Scotland]

“Scotland is blessed with an abundance of marvellous creatures great and small which inhabit land, water and air. Here is an introduction to one of the native Scottish species which features in our fantastic Scottish Wildlife Series ebook.

Meet the capercaillie, one of the most iconic Scottish wildlife species, and yet also one of its most elusive. This large wood grouse inhabits Scottish native pinewoods and conifer plantations. The male of the species, with its inky plumage, fanned tail, gleaning turquoise breast and crimson fringed eyes, is a particularly striking sight.

Unfortunately the increasingly scarcity of these habitats makes spotting these birds quite difficult. So much so in fact, that it faces a real possibility of extinction and currently features on the ‘Red List’. But there is still a chance you could catch sight of one! Even if you’re more likely to hear rather than see it.

During the ‘lekking’ or mating season which lasts from around March to the end of June, listen carefully and you might hear the distinctive call of the male – best described a low-decimal series of ‘clicks and ‘pops’ – to lure potential mates. Autumn is also a prime time to try a catch a glimpse of these shy birds before they vanish to hibernate for the winter.

Download our Scottish Wildlife Series ebook now to learn more fascinating facts about these magnificent birds and five other favourite Scottish animals.”

Learn more about Scotland’s wildlife : HERE

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #13

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #13

 

[Primitive Technology ] 

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #12

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #12

 

[Primitive Technology ] 

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

I do what I love every single day

I do what I love every single day

[Cannon Australia]

View Abraham’s work here

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • I’m a cinematographer
  • I have the absolutely best job in the world
  • I do what I love every single day
  • A camcorder
  • I felt very blessed that I fell into it at a young age
  • He’d been shooting films across Australia
  • Work for him as a cameraman
  • In the wildlife nature field
  • Recording this amazing world of ours
  • One of the joys of being a cameraman
  • Being able to share that vision with other people
  • May never actually get to see an elephant in the flesh
  • I can see improvements that I’ve made
  • Technically and also creatively
  • You should never stop pushing yourself
  • You can combine your love of those crafts with your personal interests
  • The great outdoors
  • We’ve only got one life
  • You might as well be doing what you love
  • I feel so blessed that I can go out there every day and do what I love

Job Profile  –  Cinematographer 

A cinematographer or director of photography, also known as DP or DoP, is the head of the camera and lighting crew working on a film or TV set. As a cinematographer you will be responsible for the development, look and feel of the images which will make up the final film.

To do this job you need to have a passion for film and photography. You also need to be a good communicator. If you are creative, have leadership skills and want to work in the film or television industry, then this career could be for you.

A common way into this career is to get experience of camera work by working your way up from a camera operator role. If you have a portfolio of photography or a reel of film work that you have produced yourself, then you could market this to get yourself known.

Your main tasks  would include :

  • visit a location (known as a recce) before filming to check  its suitability, access to facilities and lighting and sound potential
  • order filming and lighting equipment
  • test equipment such as lenses and filters to check their effect
  • manage all aspects of the filming, sometimes operating the camera
  • supervise the camera crew to decide on any special camera moves
  • work closely with the lighting team to decide on lighting techniques
  • review film footage with the director

Skills, interests and qualities

To be a cinematographer, you will typically need :

  • a passion for film and photography
  • knowledge and experience of camera equipment and lighting techniques
  • creative ability with a camera colour
  • colour-normal vision
  • excellent communication skills
  • the ability to work with a wide range of people
  • the ability to lead and motivate others
  • an eye for detail, and a steady hand
  • the ability to work well in a team and also independently
  • good IT skills”
Read more @ [National Career Service ]

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #11

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #11

 

[Primitive Technology ] 

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #10

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #10

 

[Primitive Technology ] 

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #9

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #9

 

[Primitive Technology ] #34 ON TRENDING

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #8

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #8

 

[Primitive Technology]

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

62 Fish at once !

62 Fish at once !

 
[Visit Scotland]

“Scotland is blessed with an abundance of marvellous creatures great and small which inhabit land, water and air. Here is an introduction to one of the native Scottish wildlife species which features in our fantastic Scottish Wildlife Series ebook.

There is just something about PUFFINS that makes them irresistible. Maybe it’s their clownish faces, comical gait or colourful parrot-like beaks, but they are without a doubt one of the most coveted sightings for birdwatchers and wildlife lovers.

Luckily for us, Scotland happens to be prime location in the British Isles to spot PUFFINS. We even have our own special nicknames for them, such as ‘tammie norries’. The majority belong to the colonies dispersed through the west and north coast of the country, but there are many smaller groups found elsewhere.

Puffins spend most of the year in the open ocean, but from late April to mid-August, hundreds of thousands of them return to Scotland to breed. July is the peak time to see the bird with their beaks brimming over with fresh fish to feed their chicks, delightfully called ‘pufflings’.

Somewhat ungainly on land, puffins are remarkably lithe swimmers, using their wings to propel themselves underwater and their webbed feet as a rudder. They also partner-up for life, with the males courting potential mates with gifts of grass and feathers. Their distinctive beaks are another source of fascination – a unique hinging mechanism makes it extraordinarily flexible and it actually drops off before the onset of winter to reveal a much dinkier beak.

Download our Scottish Wildlife Series ebook now to learn more fascinating puffin facts about these magnificent birds and five other favourite Scottish animals”

Learn more about Scotland’s wildlife : HERE