Learning not for school – but for life

Learning not for school – but for life

Explore the Finnish education system and its success factors.

Vocabulary chunks to learn from the video :
• Lifelong learning begins in early childhood
• High-quality education
• Equal learning opportunities
• Education is free
• Guidance and counseling
• Forward-looking learning methods
• Advanced digital applications to engage learners
• Coding, reading, writing and arithmetic
• Out of the classroom, into the world
• Vocational education and training
• Straight to work life
• Capable and committed teachers
• 100% of Finnish teachers hold a Master’s degree
• Teacher-student interaction
• Lifelong learning is encouraged
• Learning not for school – but for life

Would you stay in a tree house?

Would you stay in a tree house?

[Africa Travel Channel]

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • Indigenous forest
  • We are a haven for those who long to immerse themselves in the tranquility of nature
  • The young at heart
  • A true nature enthusiast’s hideout
  • Hand crafted
  • Self catering
  • Environmentally friendly tree houses
  • The lush evergreen forest
  • Modern day essentials
  • Uncompromising views
  • Over the tree tops
  • An ideal romantic honeymoon destination
  • A family breakaway
  • A life changing experience

 

Teniqua Treetops is a unique, tented tree house resort, offering eco accommodation, occupying a position high on the foothills of the ancient Outeniqua mountain range, yet situated along the magical Garden Route, close to the magnificent sea shores of the Western Cape, South Africa.

Teniqua Map

Teniqua Map2

Further information :  Teniqua Tree Tops

More African posts

How many languages are spoken in your country ?

How many languages are spoken in your country ?

 [World Economic Forum]

 

“Why learn a foreign language? Benefits of bilingualism

by Anne Merrit   at The Telegraph, 2013

Learning a foreign language is more than just a boost to your CV or handy for travelling. It will make you smarter, more decisive and even better at English, says Anne Merritt.

Physiological studies have found that speaking two or more languages is a great asset to the cognitive process. The brains of bilingual people operate differently than single language speakers, and these differences offer several mental benefits.

Below are seven cognitive advantages to learning a foreign language.   Many of these attributes are only apparent in people who speak multiple languages regularly – if you haven’t spoken a foreign tongue since your A levels, your brain might not be reaping these bilingual benefits. However, people who begin language study in their adult lives can still achieve the same levels of fluency as a young learner, and still reap the same mental benefits, too.

You become smarter

Speaking a foreign language improves the functionality of your brain by challenging it to recognise, negotiate meaning, and communicate in different language systems. This skill boosts your ability to negotiate meaning in other problem-solving tasks as well.

Students who study foreign languages tend to score better on standardised tests than their monolingual peers, particularly in the categories of maths, reading, and vocabulary.

Read more

A Tree-Mendous Christmas

A Tree-Mendous Christmas

Trees are the most recognizable sign of Christmas, but what do you know about them? Each acre of land dedicated to growing Christmas trees will provide the daily oxygen required by 18 people.

source : infographicszone.com
source : infographicszone.com

 [Sweet Home]

 

More DIY Projects

 

DIY – Christmas Tree Napkin

DIY – Christmas Tree Napkin

 [Handimania]

NAPKIN ETIQUETTE

Placing the Napkin in Your Lap    Place the napkin in your lap immediately upon seating. If there is a host or hostess, wait for him or her to take their napkin off the table and place it in his or her lap. (An exception to this rule is buffet-style meals, where you should unfold your napkin when you start eating.)

Unfolding the Napkin    Unfold your napkin in one smooth motion without “snapping” or “shaking” it open.

The size determines how you unfold a napkin in your lap.

  • Large napkins are unfolded halfway.
  • Smaller napkins are unfolded completely and cover the lap fully.

 Don’t Tuck the Napkin    Don’t tuck a napkin into your collar, between the buttons of your shirt, or in your belt.

 Using the Napkin   Use your napkin frequently during the meal to blot or pat, not wipe, your lips. Blot your lips before taking a drink of your beverage.

 Napkin Rings   If a napkin ring is present, after removing your napkin, place the ring to the top-left of the setting. At the end of the meal, grasp the napkin in the center, pull it through the ring, and lay it on the table with the point facing the center of the table.

 Temporarily Leaving the Table   When leaving the table temporarily, put your napkin on your chair. If the chair is upholstered, place the napkin soiled side up.

 Placing the Napkin at the End of the Meal   At the end of the meal :

  • The napkin is loosely folded at the end of the meal.
  • If a plate is in the center of your place setting, when leaving the table lay the napkin to the left of the plate.
  • If the center of your place setting is empty, the napkin is laid in the middle of the place setting.
  • Leave your napkin in loose folds that keep soiled parts hidden.
  • If after-dinner coffee is served at the table, the napkin remains in the lap.
source : (Etiquette Scholar)

More DIY Projects

 

DIY – Christmas Lantern

DIY – Christmas Lantern

 [Aira Tran]

Click here for template 

Here are 10 ways crafting with friends may improve mind and brain wellness :

  1. Mental challenge and problem solving

  2. Social connection

  3. Mindfulness

  4. Development of hand-eye coordination, spatial awareness and fine motor dexterity

  5. Learning and teaching

  6. Focusing attention and thoughts on a task


  7. Encouraging active creativity

  8. Gives a sense of pride and achievement

  9. Teaches patience and perseverance

  10. Facilitates memory formation and retrieval

source : (by Dr. Sarah McKay)

More DIY Projects