Do you know what an Earthscape Artist does?

Do you know what an Earthscape Artist does?

[BBC News]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching video :

  • He’s an Earthscape Artist
  • He spends his days on the beach racking the sand
  • He lets his imagination run wild
  • Geometric patterns
  • My biggest inspiration is nature
  • Translate the world I see
  • Scientific pursuit
  • By blending broad and narrow strokes he creates patterns
  • Which hovers above the design and takes pictures
  • Beach goers love his work
  • Travel miles to see it
  • He used to be Environmental Scientist
  • Follow his dream
  • Opened more doors
  • Make a living racking in the sand
  • When the tide comes in

 

 

 English vocabulay  – ECCE speaking exam – Cambridge Exams

 

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Would you take them for a walk?

Would you take them for a walk?

[1000 Londoners]

 Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching video :

  • They are quite friendly
  • I rock up (arrive somewhere) to work one morning on my bike
  • My husband had a fit (be very shocked)
  • As a wedding anniversary present
  • A wedding dress fitting
  • They are in a state with their mother
  • It just lowers the temperature a bit
  • It’s a bit of an unorthodox thing to own in West London
  • A pig farm
  • They know that I’m the boss
  • Cracky don’t be such a pig
  • I have a walking license
  • Come on lads
  • Stop being stroppy
  • When you take on livestock, your home becomes a farm
  • A pig looks you straight in the eye

Learn English with short videos – Short videos for the classroom –  English Langauge Schools – English collocations – Unusual Pets
Where do you store your winter food supply ?

Where do you store your winter food supply ?

LabofOrnithology

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • One of the most interesting birds that I have every photographed is Acorn Woodpecker
  • I found a population of woodpeckers in a Suburban Park, in Southern California
  • Thousands and thousands of holes in it
  • They are among the busiest birds
  • This is where they store their winter food supply
  • It’s a tree that has been used over the generations, multi generations
  • We don’t drill them all at once
  • Each winter they drill a few more
  • And add some more acorns to them
  • That makes Acorn Woodpeckers pretty special in the bird world
  • They’ve got glossy blue-black back
  • They’ve got red and pale yellow and black markings around their heads and faces
  • Their eyes really stand out
  • You can tell the males from the females
  • They’re highly social birds
  • They live in social groups year round, up to a dozen individuals or more
  • Dramatic and very wonderful wing-spread display
  • I really like to go watch them and photograph them
Look up #11

Look up #11

[LabofOrnithology]

Bird parents build nests of all different shapes and sizes to keep their young safe and warm. Bald Eagles, for example, build massive structures out of twigs that can be over 5 feet in diameter. Hummingbirds, such as this Cuban Emerald have a much more discreet approach. The cup-shaped nests they construct out of materials such as leaves and spiderwebs are only slightly bigger than a quarter and typically house two eggs weighing less than a gram a piece.

Look Up #9

Look Up #9

Great Big Story

 

“With a wingspan up to 10 feet in length, the mighty Andean condor is one of the largest flying birds in the world. Found throughout the Andes Mountains, the condor is a national symbol for many South American countries. This massive bird has a hairless head, which will change color depending on its emotional state. Though the condor can live up to 70 years, its population is in decline, largely due to the destruction of its natural habitat” [Great big Story]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • With wings that spread up to 10ft apart
  • One of the largest flying birds in the world
  • Found throughout the Andes Mountains
  • A national symbol
  • Emotional state
  • Used to attract females
  • With some Condors living for more that 70 years
  • It is a scavenger bird
  • South American coast
  • The population is in decline
  • Due to the destruction of its natural habitat
  • Lead poisoning from carcasses shot by hunters
 

 

Look Up #8

Look Up #8

Lab of Ornithology

 

Birds-of-Paradise sport some of the strangest feathers in the bird world. The male King-of-Saxony takes the cake with stiff ornamental feathers (up to twice the male’s body length) sprouting from the top of his head. He also has a piercing call that sounds anything but bird-like. Filmed by Tim Laman near Tari Gap in November of 2010.  Explore the Birds of Paradise Project HERE

Free lesson plans HERE

Free Teaching Resources HERE

A map of New Guinea

New Guinea

 

 

I will remember that moment for the rest of my life

I will remember that moment for the rest of my life

[Great big story]

“Emma Dahlström and Jesper Tjäder are both professional free-skiers who compete on the Swedish National Ski Team. In their careers, the pair has travelled around the world to ski some of the steepest, iciest and gnarliest slopes. But they had never experienced anything like the sheer vertical madness they took on during a recent trip to Peru. There, they shredded the sandy hillsides of Huacachina and Cerro Blanco—the highest sand dune in the world.” Visit Emma’s Instagram account HERE and Jesper’s HERE

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • The biggest sand dune in the world
  • 400 Feet of vertical drop until you get to the bottom
  • A professional free skier
  • We are both on the Swedish national team
  • Travel all over the world
  • All you could see is desert
  • It felt pretty similar to snow
  • It felt cool to ski in shorts and a t-shirt
  • We headed out to Cerro Blanco
  • We hiked with all our gear
  • It was such a crazy feeling

 

Growing portraits with grass

Growing portraits with grass

[Great big story]

“Grass is something that most of us take for granted. We walk all over it, we lay on it and sometimes mow it down. Few appreciate grass the way Dan Harvey and Heather Ackroyd do. And yet their art can stop you in your tracks. By manipulating the natural processes that fuel life itself, these British artists blur the line between science, nature and art, all while drawing attention to climate change.” Read more about the artists HERE

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • Grass is something we take  for granted
  • We walk all over it
  • We don’t give it much thought
  • The magic of seeing them in print
  • Come to life and grow
  • Blur the lines between science, nature and art
  • Mega flooding scenarios
  • Severe weather events are happening
  • Time and time again
  • Increasingly more frequently
  • Biodiversity loss
  • Climate change
  • It was within our sight
  • Photosynthesis
  • We work with the seed
  • Germinate their seeds for about two weeks
  • The image develops over the period of weeks
  • We grow the grass vertically
  • The studio space
  • We turn it into a darkroom
  • The only light that the grass receives
  • Projected negative image
  • It produces more of the chlorophyll, more of the green pigment
  • The equivalent to a black and white photograph
  • But in tones of green to yellow
  • We can work really really  large-scale
  • The resolution phenomenal
  • It’s part of a process of discovery
  • The mediums you work with
  • Part of our palette and materials that we play with
  • They can last indefinitely
  • When you can put  the lights out
  • Someone who cares passionately about what they’re doing
  • I’m still a bit taken aback by all this grass

 

#English Language Schools,  #Learn English, #Learn English Online

Look Up #5

Look Up #5

Great Big Story

 

The toco is the largest and perhaps most recognizable of the toucan family. Its striking, brightly colored bill comprises almost half of its body surface area. Toco toucans are found throughout South and Central America, but populations have declined over the last decade due mainly to the pet trade and the destruction of their rainforest habitats.  Can this beaky bird shake off these threats?

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • The largest and most recognizable
  • They are found throughout Southern and Central America
  • Their population has continued to decline
  • Their appearance is striking
  • Its iconic bill
  • It is rather light
  • To pluck out-of-reach fruit from trees
  • They are considered extremely gregarious and social birds living in flocks
  • The pet trade and the destruction of the rain forests are the main cause for decrease in population
 

 

Inspire me #11

Inspire me #11

[Banff and Lake Louise Tourism]

“For the past decade, Simon Beck has been decorating the Alps with his stunning mathematical drawings, created by running in snowshoes across freshly laid snow. Each image takes him up to 11 hours to make and covers an area about 100m x 100m, requiring him to travel up to 25 miles as he marks out the pattern. He has inspired a clothing range and has diversified into beach art. Below is a selection of his images of his creations. I spoke to him to mark the launch of his book Simon Beck: Snow Art  “read more HERE

[the guardian]

 

Look Up #4

Look Up #4

Great Big Story

 

The collared aracari is a toucan native to the tropical rainforests of Central and South America. Bright plumage and large colorful bills give these small birds a standout color palette. At just over a foot in length, the collared aracari can weigh up to 10 ounces, but most of that size comes from its bill. Sadly, their population has been decreasing due to deforestation and hunting for the pet trade.

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • Native to the Tropical Rainforests
  • A gorgeous rainbow of colors
  • The most distinct feature
  • The upper part
  • Reach just over a foot long and weigh up to 10 ounces
  • They mainly eat fruit but occasionally feed on small insects
  • Their population has been decreasing
  • A combination of deforestation and hunting for the pet trade
 

 

Look Up #3

Look Up #3

Lab of Ornithology

 

In order to fly at peak performance, birds must carefully maintain their feathers. This means removing dirt, excess oil, and parasites. Birds do this by running their bill from the base of a feather to the tip, a process known as preening. In addition to removing debris, preening also realigns feathers, improving their aerodynamic performance. Read more HERE

 [All about birds]