Look up #11

Look up #11

[LabofOrnithology]

Bird parents build nests of all different shapes and sizes to keep their young safe and warm. Bald Eagles, for example, build massive structures out of twigs that can be over 5 feet in diameter. Hummingbirds, such as this Cuban Emerald have a much more discreet approach. The cup-shaped nests they construct out of materials such as leaves and spiderwebs are only slightly bigger than a quarter and typically house two eggs weighing less than a gram a piece.

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Where do you store your winter food supply ?

Where do you store your winter food supply ?

LabofOrnithology

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • One of the most interesting birds that I have every photographed is Acorn Woodpecker
  • I found a population of woodpeckers in a Suburban Park, in Southern California
  • Thousands and thousands of holes in it
  • They are among the busiest birds
  • This is where they store their winter food supply
  • It’s a tree that has been used over the generations, multi generations
  • We don’t drill them all at once
  • Each winter they drill a few more
  • And add some more acorns to them
  • That makes Acorn Woodpeckers pretty special in the bird world
  • They’ve got glossy blue-black back
  • They’ve got red and pale yellow and black markings around their heads and faces
  • Their eyes really stand out
  • You can tell the males from the females
  • They’re highly social birds
  • They live in social groups year round, up to a dozen individuals or more
  • Dramatic and very wonderful wing-spread display
  • I really like to go watch them and photograph them
Look Up #9

Look Up #9

Great Big Story

 

“With a wingspan up to 10 feet in length, the mighty Andean condor is one of the largest flying birds in the world. Found throughout the Andes Mountains, the condor is a national symbol for many South American countries. This massive bird has a hairless head, which will change color depending on its emotional state. Though the condor can live up to 70 years, its population is in decline, largely due to the destruction of its natural habitat” [Great big Story]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • With wings that spread up to 10ft apart
  • One of the largest flying birds in the world
  • Found throughout the Andes Mountains
  • A national symbol
  • Emotional state
  • Used to attract females
  • With some Condors living for more that 70 years
  • It is a scavenger bird
  • South American coast
  • The population is in decline
  • Due to the destruction of its natural habitat
  • Lead poisoning from carcasses shot by hunters
 

 

Look Up #8

Look Up #8

Lab of Ornithology

 

Birds-of-Paradise sport some of the strangest feathers in the bird world. The male King-of-Saxony takes the cake with stiff ornamental feathers (up to twice the male’s body length) sprouting from the top of his head. He also has a piercing call that sounds anything but bird-like. Filmed by Tim Laman near Tari Gap in November of 2010.  Explore the Birds of Paradise Project HERE

Free lesson plans HERE

Free Teaching Resources HERE

A map of New Guinea

New Guinea

 

 

Look Up #6

Look Up #6

Great Big Story

 

The milky eagle owl, also known as Verreaux’s eagle-owl, is as powerful as it is beautiful. Found throughout sub-Saharan Africa, it is the continent’s largest owl. With wingspans that can stretch up to five feet in length, its size and power make it one of only a few African birds that can hunt a porcupine successfully. While it is a dominant bird, the combined effects of habitat loss, hunting, drought and disease have drastically reduced its population.

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • A milky eagle owl
  • The largest African Owl
  • It is found throughout Sub Saharan Africa 
  • The Eagle in their name refers to their large size
  • Females are much larger than males
  • Over a third bigger
  • They feed on a large variety of animals
  • Using their sharp vision
  • They spot prey
  • Seizing them with their powerful talons
  • A dominant bird
  • Its population has seen a decline
  • Due to a combination of
  • Loss of suitable habitat, hunting, disease and drought
  • A slow reproductive rate
  • Difficult for the population to recover quickly
Look Up #5

Look Up #5

Great Big Story

 

The toco is the largest and perhaps most recognizable of the toucan family. Its striking, brightly colored bill comprises almost half of its body surface area. Toco toucans are found throughout South and Central America, but populations have declined over the last decade due mainly to the pet trade and the destruction of their rainforest habitats.  Can this beaky bird shake off these threats?

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • The largest and most recognizable
  • They are found throughout Southern and Central America
  • Their population has continued to decline
  • Their appearance is striking
  • Its iconic bill
  • It is rather light
  • To pluck out-of-reach fruit from trees
  • They are considered extremely gregarious and social birds living in flocks
  • The pet trade and the destruction of the rain forests are the main cause for decrease in population
 

 

Look Up #4

Look Up #4

Great Big Story

 

The collared aracari is a toucan native to the tropical rainforests of Central and South America. Bright plumage and large colorful bills give these small birds a standout color palette. At just over a foot in length, the collared aracari can weigh up to 10 ounces, but most of that size comes from its bill. Sadly, their population has been decreasing due to deforestation and hunting for the pet trade.

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • Native to the Tropical Rainforests
  • A gorgeous rainbow of colors
  • The most distinct feature
  • The upper part
  • Reach just over a foot long and weigh up to 10 ounces
  • They mainly eat fruit but occasionally feed on small insects
  • Their population has been decreasing
  • A combination of deforestation and hunting for the pet trade
 

 

Look Up #3

Look Up #3

Lab of Ornithology

 

In order to fly at peak performance, birds must carefully maintain their feathers. This means removing dirt, excess oil, and parasites. Birds do this by running their bill from the base of a feather to the tip, a process known as preening. In addition to removing debris, preening also realigns feathers, improving their aerodynamic performance. Read more HERE

 [All about birds]

 

Look Up #2

Look Up #2

Lab of Ornithology

 

The feathers on this hummingbird’s throat are surprising. One minute they’re bright red, the next, black. This is known as iridescence, a common, showy feature of many birds’ plumages, from hummingbirds to starlings to jays to ducks. Iridescence doesn’t exist as a pigment—it is a structural color created by light striking the feathers. In each iridescent feather, keratin, melanin, and air are arranged in such a way that the appearance of the feather changes at different viewing angles.

 [All about birds]

 

Look Up

Look Up

Lab of Ornithology

 

The Wire-tailed Manakin’s dance may be one of the most impressive in the bird world, but it can’t be performed on just any dance floor. Like many other species with elaborate displays, the male very carefully selects his dance site relative to the sites of other males in the area. Together these sites are known as an exploded lek. Each male picks a location that is easily visible to females and then carefully maintains it, clearing away anything that might obscure the view or get in the way of his performance. 

 [All about birds]

 

The Birds of Paradise

The Birds of Paradise

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • They transform themselves into something that you’ve never seen before
  • They are unlike any creatures on earth
  • Most outstanding phenomena ever witnessed
  • Evolutionary Biologist
  • Wildlife photographer
  • 39 Species of these miraculous birds
  • In an attempt to comprehend their secrets
  • How did that come to be
  • Exceptional Beauty
  • One of nature’s most extraordinary hidden wonders

Some interesting facts :

Males use their voices to broadcast their location and entice distant females to come and look. When females approach, males turn on the visuals, which often come with their own more intimate sounds.

A map of New Guinea

New Guinea

Explore more @ Birds of Paradise Project 

Free lesson plans can be found HERE

Free Webinars can be found HERE