Where do you store your winter food supply ?

Where do you store your winter food supply ?

LabofOrnithology

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • One of the most interesting birds that I have every photographed is Acorn Woodpecker
  • I found a population of woodpeckers in a Suburban Park, in Southern California
  • Thousands and thousands of holes in it
  • They are among the busiest birds
  • This is where they store their winter food supply
  • It’s a tree that has been used over the generations, multi generations
  • We don’t drill them all at once
  • Each winter they drill a few more
  • And add some more acorns to them
  • That makes Acorn Woodpeckers pretty special in the bird world
  • They’ve got glossy blue-black back
  • They’ve got red and pale yellow and black markings around their heads and faces
  • Their eyes really stand out
  • You can tell the males from the females
  • They’re highly social birds
  • They live in social groups year round, up to a dozen individuals or more
  • Dramatic and very wonderful wing-spread display
  • I really like to go watch them and photograph them
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The Birds of Paradise

The Birds of Paradise

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • They transform themselves into something that you’ve never seen before
  • They are unlike any creatures on earth
  • Most outstanding phenomena ever witnessed
  • Evolutionary Biologist
  • Wildlife photographer
  • 39 Species of these miraculous birds
  • In an attempt to comprehend their secrets
  • How did that come to be
  • Exceptional Beauty
  • One of nature’s most extraordinary hidden wonders

Some interesting facts :

Males use their voices to broadcast their location and entice distant females to come and look. When females approach, males turn on the visuals, which often come with their own more intimate sounds.

A map of New Guinea

New Guinea

Explore more @ Birds of Paradise Project 

Free lesson plans can be found HERE

Free Webinars can be found HERE 

Look up #13 – Live now

Look up #13 – Live now

[LabofOrnithology]

This FeederWatch cam is located in the Treman Bird Feeding Garden at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Perched on the edge of both Sapsucker Woods and its 10-acre pond, these feeders attract both forest species like chickadees and woodpeckers as well as some species that prefer open environments near water like Red-winged Blackbirds.

Watch LIVE at  All About Birds  for news, updates, and more information about the pond and its surroundings.

The world of birds at your fingertips HERE

Look up #12

Look up #12

[LabofOrnithology]

Birds can use their feathers for much more than flight. In some species, for example, they produce sound. The secondary wing feathers of the male Club-Winged Manakin, a bird from South America, are large and rigid. He strikes them together at about 107 times per second to create a buzzing sound, which is used during courtship displays.

The world of birds at your fingertips HERE

Look up #11

Look up #11

[LabofOrnithology]

Bird parents build nests of all different shapes and sizes to keep their young safe and warm. Bald Eagles, for example, build massive structures out of twigs that can be over 5 feet in diameter. Hummingbirds, such as this Cuban Emerald have a much more discreet approach. The cup-shaped nests they construct out of materials such as leaves and spiderwebs are only slightly bigger than a quarter and typically house two eggs weighing less than a gram a piece.

Look Up #9

Look Up #9

Great Big Story

 

“With a wingspan up to 10 feet in length, the mighty Andean condor is one of the largest flying birds in the world. Found throughout the Andes Mountains, the condor is a national symbol for many South American countries. This massive bird has a hairless head, which will change color depending on its emotional state. Though the condor can live up to 70 years, its population is in decline, largely due to the destruction of its natural habitat” [Great big Story]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • With wings that spread up to 10ft apart
  • One of the largest flying birds in the world
  • Found throughout the Andes Mountains
  • A national symbol
  • Emotional state
  • Used to attract females
  • With some Condors living for more that 70 years
  • It is a scavenger bird
  • South American coast
  • The population is in decline
  • Due to the destruction of its natural habitat
  • Lead poisoning from carcasses shot by hunters