How to learn English with Lexical Chunks

How to learn English with Lexical Chunks

Seth Silberman wrote :

Native speakers use lexical chunks, or groups of words commonly used together, without understanding what they are or how they work. Non-native speakers who master lexical chunks will sound more colloquial and assured when they speak English. With an understanding of lexical chunks, non-native speakers will be able to effectively use colloquial phrases that often do not mean the same thing when each word is individually defined.

Pay attention to how words work together when hearing or practicing sentences in English. According to Michael Lewis, who coined the term “lexical approach,” people learn and use languages as word combinations. Rather than emphasize only building vocabulary and learning grammar rules, Lewis suggests that collections of words that work as a unit drive communication, making lexis, not grammar, the key to understanding how the English language operates.
Follow Lewis’ language learning model: observe, hypothesize and experiment. Taking note of the kinds of words that commonly appear together will prevent the English learner from saying or writing sentences that may be grammatically correct, but still sound awkward. For example, native speakers would remark about a particularly “strong tea,” not a rugged one, even though “strong” and “rugged” are synonyms. Learn collocations, or word partnerships, like “broad daylight” or “by heart” by hypothesizing what they mean from context. Then, experiment using these collocations in sentences.
Focus on the use and placement of nouns in English sentences. Use a dictionary for unfamiliar words, but think of their use, not simply their definition, in relationship to the sentence’s central nouns. Read materials about the same subject matter to discover common collocations used to discuss that topic. Read for word patterns, not simply for subject-verb agreement or other grammar rules.
Read newspapers or sit in public places like a coffee shop to see and hear everyday English in use. Use a note pad to write down familiar collocations. Follow the nouns and use context to guess what unfamiliar words might mean. Check unfamiliar words in a dictionary later. Practice writing new sentences using these collocations in different ways.
Watch and record news programs and comedies. Write out the words spoken as if providing a transcript. Take note of how the nouns anchor the lexical chunks used. Pay particular attention to how lexical chunks produce comedy, often through puns or misuse of a phrase. The word associations that produce laughter often mean quite different things when broken apart.

Lexical approach classroom activities can be found   HERE

About the author : Based in New York City, Seth Silberman has written and edited articles for various websites since 2006. His articles have been published in numerous books and scholarly journals as well as in “VIBE” magazine, “Paste” magazine, “Creative Loafing Atlanta” and “The Hartford Courant.” Silberman holds a Doctor of Philosophy in comparative literature from University of Maryland, College Park.

 

In it together

In it together

Green Renaissance

The last few weeks have been a roller coaster of intense emotions. All of us, all over the world, have had to start to change the way we do things. Many have cut back on travel plans, some are avoiding crowded spaces, and most have dropped handshakes and hugs for elbow bumps and foot shakes.

As hard as it might be for some of us right now, it seems that what we need is more empathy, understanding, and compassion for one another. Most of us are some version of scared – this is a change and a big change. Like with any change, we don’t know what will happen and how it will turn out. But what we do know for sure, is that we can’t really do too much without each other.

Vocabulary chunks to learn from video :

The conductor is not just a time beater
It has different elements to it
We are going to make music
It’s not a shouting match
Taking the rubbish out
It’s a calling
Infectious energy
Your fellow musicians
A positive vibe
We need positive vibes these days
Ode to Joy
Everybody knows the tune
I could not imagine the world without music
I would like to be a fly on the wall
There you go
Nature is such a powerful force
Belting down with rain
An amazing show of power
The purpose of life
To live life that is full of interesting things
Not stuck in a rut
Read about new things
Be interested
Have you heart open for new ideas
Seeking perfection

 

Fold, roll or bundle

Fold, roll or bundle

[Heathrow Airport]

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • Expert advice
  • Cabin crew
  • Fly 24/7
  • You know a thing or two
  • How best to get it all in
  • To make the job easier
  • Eliminate about a third
  • The truth is like your wardrobe you never use as much as you take
  • Stuff underwear or socks inside
  • Fill awkward gaps with very soft items
  • Bulkier items
  • Minimize creasing and maximize space
  • One by one fold the garments back in
  • Throw a bag from the dry cleaner on top of your packing
  • Next up non clothing items, such as toiletries, books and cameras
  • Double back your toiletries
  • Stain free clothes and gunk free cameras
  • Rather than stuffing the inside pockets of your case with all the bits your forgot to pack
Would you travel in the rolling home ?

Would you travel in the rolling home ?

 [Calum Creasery]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • A small budget
  • A dream home
  • 8000 Miles across Europe
  • We have made films
  • We have documented all our travels
  • A compilation of photos
  • Support our kickstarter

More @ The Rolling Home on Instagram

American English – British English – Oxford University Press 

 

Life just tastes better with chocolate

Life just tastes better with chocolate

  [Andrew Whitlatch]

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • A chocolate maker
  • I’m originally from South Africa
  • Family  get togethers
  • I moved to the states to get into finance
  • A celebration of chocolate
  • It is believed that chocolate is a superfood
  • Nutritional value of this superfood
  • We do chocolate bars, and we do truffles
  • We make the best chocolate in the world
  • Anything is possible
  • Everyone there loves what they do
  • It almost freaks me out  a little bit how much people  like being there

Visit Fine & Raw HERE

Are you changing at Jamaica?

Are you changing at Jamaica?

[Jet Blue]

Changing trains at Jamaica Station is a rush-hour ritual for millions of Long Island Railroad commuters. Watch as JetBlue surprises a few of them with a different kind of change. Ready for your own Jamaica moment? Book now at JetBlue.

Vocabulary chunks to learn from video :

• Good morning from Jamaica
• Are you changing at Jamaica
• In Jamaica it’s 85 degrees
• How long was your commute
• You’re on the beach, relax
• Feel the warmth
• A train ticket
• No joking matter now, serious now
• How would you like to trade in this train ticket for a plane ticket
• We’re sending you to Jamaica
• Take care

 

What are lexical chunks ?

What are lexical chunks ?

Lexical Chunks

A Lexical Chunk is a unit of language which is made up of two or more words.

Here are a few examples of lexical chunks :

Good morning.
Nice to see you!
What’s the time?

Other lexical chunks can include phrasal verbs‏‎, idioms, collocation‏‎s and so on.

Lexical chunks are the common coinage of English. They’re the bread and butter, the everyday and the mundane. They’re the reliable standards around which we can hang poetic and emotive language.

Read more

Do something great

Do something great

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Do somenting great