Zero waste

Zero waste

great big story

The village of Kamikatsu in Japan has taken their commitment to sustainability to a new level. While the rest of the country has a recycling rate of around 20 percent, Kamikatsu surpasses its neighbors with a staggering 80 percent. After becoming aware of the dangers of carbon monoxide associated with burning garbage, the town instated the Zero Waste Declaration with the goal of being completely waste-free by 2020.

Vocabulary chunks to learn from video :

  • Tea fields
  • Idyllic mountains
  • Produces no trash
  • Created carbon dioxide emissions
  • Zero waste
  • A new way of living
  • No such thing as throwing something in the trash
  • Everything has to get recycled
  • In the beginning it was difficult
  • She’s a housewife
  • The classification system
  • Is the key to Kamikatsu’s success
  • A huge burden
  • A way of life
  • Looking at trash differently

Map of Kamikatsu – Japan

Αποτέλεσμα εικόνας για kamikatsu japan map

 

 

rituals

rituals

tealeaves

Learn how to make Matcha green tea through a traditional Chado Japanese Tea Ceremony. Making the perfect cup of tea for the Japanese is an integral aspect of their culture, and this ritual is no exception.

One of the healthiest beverages on the planet. Discovered over 900 years ago, Matcha gives the drinker a long-lasting boost of energy, expanded awareness, and maximum antioxidants without the unwanted side effects typical to coffee or a sugar high. READ MORE

Trees can fly

Trees can fly

  [Hoshincu]

How to make Air Bonsai :

  [Hoshincu]

“A Japanese firm called Hoshinchu is producing kits for customers to produce their own floating versions of tiny house plants called Air Bonsai.

The tiny trees contain spongy balls of moss that contain magnets that sit above a porcelain base that similarly contain magnets which repel those found in the moss. 

How do the trees float :

The Air Bonsai kit is made up of two parts – an ‘energy base’ and the ‘little star’ which floats a few centimetres above the base.

The ‘stars’ are spongy balls of moss 2.3-inches (6cm) across containing magnets weighing around 250 grams

The porcelain base contains magnets and a rotating mechanism and is connected to the mains by an AC adapter.

The magnets repel each other to create the illusion of levitation. 

To plant the trees, customers poke a hole in the ball and add the cutting of the plant or a seedling. 

The website shows a number of bonsai trees which have been grown for a number of years spinning off the ground.

An additional pot is available in the form of a lava stone, instead of the moss ball.”

[Daily Mail UK]
Japan – Endless Discovery

Japan – Endless Discovery

  [Lonely Planet]

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • Social Communications Manager
  • Culture and Historical Activities
  • There is a real contrast between the old and the new, the hyper-modern and super traditional
  • Top Travel Bloggers
  • A really memorable trip
  • A unique cultural experience
  • Busy financial hub
  • A studio, a café and a shop all combined into one
  • The place where the best artists get together to showcase their work
  • I’m going to step back 600 years to experience some authentic Japanese culture
  • Big bold dramatic moves
  • But what struck me was the concentration
  • I don’t quite know how to put it into words
  • It was just mesmerizing
  • Goes back, since well before the 2nd world war
  • Huge frantic city
  • Natural mineral pigments
  • Working in this particular medium, this is Mecca
  • Brightly colored minerals
  • Grind them down into different particles
  • Over a thousand years of tradition
  • It brings a new level of respect
  • The perfect blend of old and new
  • A walk back in time
  • Focusing on the challenges ahead
  • The tea ceremony
  • No ordinary person would be allowed in; it was a very special place
  • They are worth Splurging and spending money on
  • Once in a lifetime experiences that you have to sample when you come to Japan
  • A bond they have with nature

Job Profile –  Travel Blogger  :

“As a writer or author you would produce a variety of types of creative work, including novels, children’s books, poetry and, travel and technical writing. If you’ve got excellent writing skills, and you’ve got the determination and the self-motivation needed to make it in this career, there could be opportunities for you as a writer.

As a writer you could work for yourself writing novels, short stories, plays and poetry. You may wish to choose a writing specialism such as writing children’s books, travel or technical writing. You could also write features for newspapers, magazines, radio, film or television. You may also write for social media, websites or blogs. Depending on your role your work could include:

  • choosing your subject based on personal interest or on a commission given by agents or publishers
  • coming up with themes, ideas or plots
  • researching information using the internet, libraries and personal interviews
  • submitting your draft to a publisher, either speculatively or through an agent
  • revising your work if necessary, after getting feedback
  • pursuing publishing opportunities
  • developing an understanding of copyright law

You may be interested in working as a travel writer, creating guide books, features, hotel reviews or travel novels. Writing travel blogs, articles for websites and updating travel links on Facebook and Twitter could also be part of your job.

Skills, interests and qualities

To become a writer, you should have:

  • excellent writing skills
  • self-discipline and motivation
  • the ability to develop creative ideas
  • perseverance and determination
  • a willingness to work alone for long periods
  • the ability to accept criticism
  • drawing skills, if you wish to illustrate your own work
  • excellent research skills
  • the ability to meet deadlines
  • IT skills
  • the ability to market and promote your work”
[National Career Service ]
Weekly photo challenge – Names

Weekly photo challenge – Names

 

“A brand is a reason to choose” 

– Cheryl Burgess

name-2.jpg.jpeg

name-1.jpg.jpeg

photography by vocabularyinchunks

 

Bridgestone Corporation (株式会社ブリヂストン, Kabushiki-gaisha Burijisuton?) (TYO: 5108, OTC Pink: BRDCY) is a multinational auto and truck parts manufacturer founded in 1931 by Shojiro Ishibashi (石橋正二郎, Ishibashi Shōjirō?) in the city of Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan. The name Bridgestone comes from a calque translation and transposition of ishibashi, meaning “stone bridge” in Japanese.

Read more about the company here :

In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Names
More of my Weekly Photo Challenges
It’s just something very magical

It’s just something very magical

[Green Renaissance]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • My love affair for mushrooms started when I had to walk
  • It has developed into basically growing my own Shiitake Mushrooms out of logs
  • They help with cholesterol
  • They’ll break down tumors if you catch them in time
  • They’ll build up your immune system
  • I reckon that anybody can do it
  • An oak log between the diameter of 10cm-30cm
  • Give it a two-week rest period
  • A little gap of air underneath
  • Dab some wax on the top of it
  • Keep moisture content up
  • To keep bugs and mice away
  • Off ground
  • Cool shady area
  • It’s just something very magical

Shiitake Mushrooms for Wellness & Miso Ginger Soup

Found growing in moist forests on the decaying trunks of fallen trees, Shiitake mushrooms have been an important medicine and food source in Asia for thousands of years. These “flower mushrooms” are used to support a healthy immune system and are frequently eaten during an occasional bout of seasonal sniffles. They’re also really delicious, with a nice meaty texture. Food is medicine, right?

The stories say that a thousand years ago, a farmer decided to score a moist log and then packed wild Shiitakes into the notched wood. To his happy surprise, the inoculation was successful and soon whole mushrooms grew from the trunk, making Shiitakes one of the first cultivated fungi. These much beloved mushrooms can be taken as an extract, tea, or in capsule form. They’re also commonly used in cooking and can be easily reconstituted to use in soups, stir-fries, curries, and sautés, or powdered and used in gravies.

Read more