3 Minute English #7 – English Pubs

3 Minute English #7 – English Pubs

[Loescher Editore Video]

Vocabulary chunks to learn from video :

  • One of the oldest pubs in the UK.
  • Over a thousand years ago
  • The word pub is short for a public house.
  • In other words a house open to everybody to meet
  • Pubs need a license to sell alcoholic drinks
  • To young people under 18
  • UNIT 2
  • Full of ornaments and curios objects.
  • Pubs, sell wine, soft drinks and naturally different types of beer
  • The beer is served in half pints or pints
  • An ideal place to relax and chat
  • Whether you stand or sit at a table and read
  • Traditional British dishes such as fish and chips
TV shows to learn English – Intermediate

TV shows to learn English – Intermediate

TV shows to help you with your English if you are at an Intermediate Level .  Watch Cooking Programs, Sitcoms (Situational Comedies),

  1.  Nigella Lawson

2. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall

3.  Jamie Oliver 

4.  The Vicar of Dibley

 

 

 

TV shows to learn English – Pre-Intermediate

TV shows to learn English – Pre-Intermediate

TV shows to help you with your English if you are at a Pre-Intermediate Level .  Watch Nature Programs

  1.  David Attenborough – Our Planet

2.  David Attenborough – Planet Earth

3.  David Attenborough – Blue Planet

4.  David Attenborough – Frozen Planet

 

 

3 Minute English #4

3 Minute English #4

[BBC Learning English]

Vocabulary chunks

whirlwind romance – romantic relationship which develops quickly

tying the knot – getting married (informal)

blind date – romantic meeting of people who don’t know each other

fell in love – became romantically attached (to someone)

engagement – promise of marriage

Something has landed from another galaxy

Something has landed from another galaxy

[great big story]

Tour Sweden’s Luxury Treehouses

Vocabulary chunks from the video :

• Deep in the forest
• Something has landed from another galaxy
• A flying saucer
• A famous architect
• From another world
• Tree top hotel
• 100 miles from the capital of Stockholm
• The southern edge of the Arctic circle
• The remote corner of the world
• A great view of the river
• They have their own unique design
• A mirror cube
• It reflects the forest
• An optical illusion
• A bird’s nest
• Covered with branches
• Where Santa Claus lives
• The tallest tree house
• A grove of pines
• Sleep out under the stars
• Boxy frames
• A luxury resort
• A collection of tree houses
• The wonder of the Arctic wilderness

Have you ever had a Jam Jar Salad?

Have you ever had a Jam Jar Salad?

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • Something you can rustle together very very quickly
  • It can save you a lot of money
  • Delicious healthy food
  • We want to have all the elements of a balanced plate
  • Crunchy things at top and wet things at the bottom
  • So it doesn’t go soggy
  • Under 600 calories
  • It’s going to release energy nice and slowly
  • It shouldn’t take any more than about 3 minutes to put together
  • Just grab and go
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • A pinch of salt and pepper
  • A little squeeze of lemon juice
  • Give it a little toss around
  • Pop it in, press it down
  • Different flavors and herbs
  • Influences from other countries
  • Meals on the go
Who knocked you up this morning ?

Who knocked you up this morning ?

[great big story]

Imagine life without alarm clocks. Workdays would start at noon, breakfast would be brunch, and no one would make it to class before the first bell. From the early 1800s through the 1960s, factory workers didn’t have much of a choice. To get to work on time, they relied on “knocker-uppers,” aka, human alarm clocks. Using long bamboo sticks, or peashooters, Britain’s knocker-uppers would stroll down the streets rapping at windows to help their patrons kick-start their days.

Vocabulary chunks from the video :

• They were called knocker-ups
• We’re travelling back in time
• The early 1800s
• A paid job
• A bamboo pole
• Be up early for their shift
• Industrial cities
• A hook or knob on the end
• Wakey wakey
• Pea shooters
• Why not just shout
• The evidence suggests
• Mystery solved

A tongue-twister :

We had a knocker-up, and our knocker-up had a knocker-up

And our knocker-up’s knocker-up didn’t knock our knocker up

So our knocker-up didn’t knock us up

‘Cos he’s not up.