Live and eat by the season

Live and eat by the season

green renaissance

“The sunchoke, or Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus), is an edible tuber that grows underground, much like a potato. They look a little bit like large knobs of ginger. They taste slightly nutty and savory like a cross between an artichoke heart and the best potato you’ve ever had.
Native Americans cultivated them and they became a popular crop in Europe after colonization of the Americas. They fell out of popularity until just the past couple of decades”. [the spruce.com] read more

Vocabulary chunks to learn from the video :

• Live on a farm
• Producing our own vegetables
• A beekeeping business
• City life
• Live by the season
• Eat by the season
• Jerusalem Artichokes
• A bulb that grows underground
• Shave them raw into a salad
• Roast them as roast veggies
• Takes it to another level
• Start shopping at a farmer’s market
• A local beekeeper

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Al dente

Al dente

Barilla Greece

 

In cooking, al dente /ælˈdɛnteɪ/ (Italian pronunciation: [al ˈdɛnte]) describes pasta that is cooked to be firm to the bite. The etymology is Italian “to the tooth”.  In contemporary Italian cooking, the term identifies the ideal consistency for pasta and involves a brief cooking time. Molto al dente is the culinary term for slightly undercooked pasta.  Undercooking pasta is used in the first round of cooking when a pasta dish is going to be cooked twice.
Pasta that is cooked al dente has a lower glycemic index than pasta that is cooked soft.  When cooking commercial pasta, the al dente phase occurs right after the white of the pasta center disappears.  Also known as pasta that is neither too hard nor too soft. [Wikipedia]

A big fat Greek-Italian wedding on a plate

A big fat Greek-Italian wedding on a plate

  [Jamie Oliver]

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • A hot summer’s day
  • My big fat Greek-Italian Wedding on a plate
  • BBQ Lamb
  • Lamb chops
  • Heavy on the black pepper
  • Pound the hell out of it
  • Sprinkle this  over
  • Throw it on the grill
  • A wood fire
  • The wood oven
  • Simple roasted carrots  with some onions
  • With tin foil over it
  • I’m going to add loads of bay leaves
  • I’m going to hit it up with some honey
  • A nice big handful of pistachios
  • This goes back in the oven
  • Fast cooking cut of meat or a slow cooking cut of meat
  • Some bits of charcoal
  • Fat facing down
  • Bulgur wheat
  • I’ve trashed the tin
  • We taking lamb to another level
  • This is a Greek-Italian love fest
  • Viva food tube

Job Profile  –  Chef

“Chefs prepare food using a variety of cooking methods. In large kitchens they usually work as part of a team. The head chef runs the entire kitchen.

You will need to have a keen interest in food and cooking, and be able to do several tasks at once. You’ll be able to show off your creative side by presenting dishes in imaginative ways.

If you love food and really enjoy cooking, this could be the perfect career for you.

You may not need any academic qualifications to start work as a trainee chef, although it may help if you have a good general standard of education including GCSEs in subjects like English and maths.

Your main tasks as a chef would include :

  • preparing, cooking and presenting food in line with required standards
  • keeping preparation at the right level
  • making sure that food is served promptly
  • monitoring food production to ensure consistent quality and portion size
  • stock control
  • following relevant hygiene, health and safety guidelines.

Skills, interests and qualities

To become a chef, you will need to have:

  • a keen interest in food and cooking
  • strong communication and leadership skills
  • the ability to work under pressure
  • high standards of cleanliness and hygiene
  • the ability to do several tasks at once
  • creativity and imagination for food presentation
  • the ability to work as part of a team
  • good organisation skills”
[National Career Service ]

 

I travel to change my view

I travel to change my view

 [Marko Roth]

“Follow us as we travel to India, our most thrilling backpacking adventure yet. We went on a safari, hiked to the peak of a mountain, visited impressive Hindu temples, spent the night with friendly locals at a homestay in Wayanad and experienced the unique kitchen of India with its exceptionally delicious fruits & vegetables.”  Check out the full story HERE 

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • I travel to change my view
  • I travel for the taste
  • I travel to feel alive
  • I travel for that moment

 

I travel to get to know the unknown

I travel to get to know the unknown

 [Marko Roth]

“In 2015 we explored Bhutan & Nepal and were absolutely overwhelmed by its beauty. We went rafting in the Barauli river, did a safari in Chitwan National Park to bath with elephants and observe rhinos and tigers, watched the prayers of monks, made friends with the locals, discovered the valley of Paro with horses and climbed the Mount Everest in the Himalaya (not really 😛 but we saw it from an airplane).” Check out the full story HERE 

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • I travel to learn and to forget
  • I travel to redraw my boundaries
  • I travel to come back home
  • I travel for that moment

 

They’re frozen and fruity

They’re frozen and fruity

woolworths sa

They’re frozen, they’re fruity, and they’re perfect for a snack or dessert on a hot day. Try these simple fruit popsicles, using our new Fruity Toots: pots of ready to eat fruit, perfect for the little one or tween on the go.

Introducing Fruity Toots – pots of ready to eat fruit for your younger ones:
– watermelon, mango, pineapple & grape
– mango, apple, grape, melon & pineapple

Creamy yoghurt pops :
Add low fat plain yoghurt to mixed fruit pots like watermelon, mango, pineapple & grape.
Make sure to cover fruit. Place popsicle sticks in the cups and freeze to set.

Simple smoothie pops :
Blend pots like mango & pineapple with water until smooth. Pour back into pots, add the popsicle sticks and freeze until set.

The Little Paris Kitchen

The Little Paris Kitchen

[Chronicle Books]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • When I was a kid I didn’t eat much French food
  • French chefs
  • I cook professionally
  • I’ve trained in Paris and studied at a culinary school
  • They soften up because it’s French Patisserie
  • Tart pastry
  • A chopping board
  • You do what you have to do, to make your kitchen work
  • A barbecue version
  • A red white marinade
  • The way you present it is a bit different
  • It should be a pleasure to eat
  • Calculate the calories
  • That’s it

 

Visit Rachel’s site here  

Yum

Yum

[woolworths south africa]

Falafel snacks

Cut Woolworths multiseed wraps into smaller circles. (Tip: keep the extra trimmings.) Char the edges slightly, then top with tzatziki or beetroot hummus, warm falafels, fresh mint and crunchy seeds. Ta da!

Creative croutons

Take those leftover wrap strips and pan fry until golden and crunchy. Serve as delicious croutons on your Woolworths roasted butternut & beetroot salad. Yum!

Summer nachos

Cut a multiseed wrap into triangles and grill until crisp. Serve warm, topped with full cream Ayrshire plain yoghurt, ready to eat slaw, cooked corn, cut from the cob, fresh jalapeños and fresh coriander. Enjoy!

Tis the season to be jolly #14

Tis the season to be jolly #14

[woolworths sa]

‘Tis the season to be jolly #10

‘Tis the season to be jolly #10

[M&S]
Would you eat a PO’BOY sandwich?

Would you eat a PO’BOY sandwich?

[Bon Appetit]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • It’s a very messy sandwich
  • I think this is maybe like a jelly
  • Not bad, not bad at all
  • Dip the sandwich into it
  • Take a bite
  • Pretty good
  • This is a masterpiece
  • For the record I’m not the best sandwich maker
  • It doesn’t hold together very well
  • I’m not the patient kind of person 

Easy as pie

Easy as pie

[Co-Op Food]

(as) Easy as Pie (Idiom)

Meaning :  A task or job that is simple or pleasurable to finish, requiring little effort; simple.

Example Having such a busy schedule today prevents me from making a hearty breakfast for myself, so I’ll just make a quick bowl of cereal for myself instead since it is as easy as pie to make.

Origin This phrase is believed to come from the pleasantness and ease involved when eating a delicious pie. Basically, something is as easy as eating a pie. Evidently, during the 19th century, the word ‘pie’ was used to describe someone as being delightful or to depict something as being easy.

[knowyourphrase]
Recipe :
This festive tart couldn’t be easier, with jarred mincemeat and ready made pastry.

FEEDS 10 PREP 20 mins COOK 35 mins + 15 mins to cool

Ingredients :

320g pack puff pastry, at room temperature

300g Co-op mincemeat

Read more

Breakfast Time – Baked Omelette Roll

Breakfast Time – Baked Omelette Roll

Recipe :  all recipes

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • It bakes in the oven
  • Six servings of breakfast ready all at the same time
  • Ground black pepper
  • An interesting crossover between a crepe and eggs
  • Your favourite filling ingredients
  • Shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • Bake the omelette in a pre-heated oven
  • Until the eggs are set
  • Place it onto a  serving platter
  • Cut into 6 equal sized portions
  • The variations are endless

How do you like your coffee?

How do you like your coffee?

[Buzzfeedblue]

coffee (n.) c. 1600, from Italian caffe, from Turkish kahveh, from Arabic qahwah “coffee,” said originally to have meant “wine,” but perhaps rather from Kaffa region of Ethiopia, a home of the plant (coffee in Kaffa is called buno, which was borrowed into Arabic as bunn “raw coffee”). Much initial diversity of spelling, including chaoua. Yemen was the first great coffee exporter and to protect its trade decreed that no living plant could leave the country. In 16c., a Muslim pilgrim brought some coffee beans from Yemen and raised them in India. Appeared in Europe (from Arabia) c. 1515-1519. Introduced to England by 1650, and by 1675 the country had more than 3,000 coffee houses. Coffee plantations established in Brazil 1727. Meaning “a light meal at which coffee is served” is from 1774.Coffee break attested from 1952, at first often in glossy magazine advertisements by the Pan-American Coffee Bureau. Coffee pot from 1705.

Did you drink a cup of coffee on company time this morning? Chances are that you did–for the midmorning coffee break is rapidly becoming a standard fixture in American offices and factories. [“The Kiplinger Magazine,” March 1952]

 [Online Etymology Dictionary]