Look Up #9

Look Up #9

Great Big Story

 

“With a wingspan up to 10 feet in length, the mighty Andean condor is one of the largest flying birds in the world. Found throughout the Andes Mountains, the condor is a national symbol for many South American countries. This massive bird has a hairless head, which will change color depending on its emotional state. Though the condor can live up to 70 years, its population is in decline, largely due to the destruction of its natural habitat” [Great big Story]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • With wings that spread up to 10ft apart
  • One of the largest flying birds in the world
  • Found throughout the Andes Mountains
  • A national symbol
  • Emotional state
  • Used to attract females
  • With some Condors living for more that 70 years
  • It is a scavenger bird
  • South American coast
  • The population is in decline
  • Due to the destruction of its natural habitat
  • Lead poisoning from carcasses shot by hunters
 

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #4

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #4

[Primitive Technology]

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Up close and personal

Up close and personal

  [Great Big story]

Every winter, Norwegian marine biologist Andreas B. Heide sails north in search of whales, especially orcas. He’s not just there to document these incredible creatures from the boat, however—he jumps in and swims right along with them. Orcas are some of the most powerful and intelligent predators on the planet, but by approaching them with respect and establishing trust, Andreas has been able to gain perspective on how they live, interact, and even play. His hope is to increase awareness for conservation efforts by documenting his up-close-and-personal interactions with these surprisingly gentle giants.

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • I was scared to death
  • But it chooses not to
  • I am a sailor, adventurer and marine biologist from Norway
  • It’s harsh and also tremendously beautiful
  • Nature at its very best
  • To make a documentary about orcas and whales in the wild
  • Observe them from a distance
  • They are gentle yet so fast
  • Once you’ve made eye contact with an orca there is no turning back
 
 
Where there’s a will, there’s a way #3

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #3

[Primitive Technology]

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Super delicious

Super delicious

 [tiger in a jar]
Beetroot Facts

Beetroot is herbaceous plant that belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. This plant originates from India, Mediterranean areas and Atlantic coast of Europe, but it can be found all over the world today. Beetroot is cultivated mainly because of its high nutritional value. Chemical compounds isolated from beetroot are used in medicine, chemical and food industry. Beetroot was used as ornamental plant in the past. Assyrians were using beetroot in Hanging Gardens of Babylon 800 years BC.
Did you know  :
Beetroot develops leafy stem that can grow 39 to 78 inches in height.
Beetroot has heart-shaped leaves. They are usually 2 to 8 inches long in wild plants and much longer in cultivated varieties.
Most people cultivate beetroot because of its edible root. It develops 55 to 65 days after planting of seed. Root is usually red to purple in color. Unlike other types of vegetables, root contains high quantities of sugar.
Beetroot develops small, green or reddish flowers that appear in dense spikes. Flowers are pollinated by wind.
Fruit of beetroot is called nutlet. It has hard structure and it is arranged in clusters.
Beetroot has high nutritional value. Besides high content of sugar, beetroot is rich source of vitamins B6 and B9 and minerals such as iron, magnesium and potassium.
Beetroot can be used raw, cooked or pickled. It is often used for salads, soups and as an ingredient of dishes made of meat. Beetroot can be also used for the manufacture of wine.
Leaves of beetroot are also edible. Fresh leaves taste like spinach.
Leaves of beetroot were used for binding of wounds in the ancient Greece. Beetroot was popular “mouth freshener” in the past. It was used to eliminate the smell of garlic. Latest medical experiments showed that beetroot lowers blood pressure and increases endurance in athletes. It also prevents development of liver diseases which result from protein deficiency, diabetes or alcohol abuse.
Beetroot juice was used as dye in the past. During the 19th century, women used beetroot for dyeing of hair.
Betain is a substance isolated from beetroot. It is responsible for the purple color of the root. This substance is used in food industry to improve color and taste of desserts, jams, ice-creams, jellies, tomato sauces and breakfast cereals.
Home-made lotion (produced by boiling the beetroot) can be used for the removal of dandruff.
Juice made of beetroot can be used instead of litmus paper to determine acidity or alkalinity of solution. One drop of beetroot juice changes its color in pink in acid solutions and into yellow in alkaline solution.
[soft schools]
How many languages are spoken in your country ?

How many languages are spoken in your country ?

 [World Economic Forum]

 

“Why learn a foreign language? Benefits of bilingualism

by Anne Merrit   at The Telegraph, 2013

Learning a foreign language is more than just a boost to your CV or handy for travelling. It will make you smarter, more decisive and even better at English, says Anne Merritt.

Physiological studies have found that speaking two or more languages is a great asset to the cognitive process. The brains of bilingual people operate differently than single language speakers, and these differences offer several mental benefits.

Below are seven cognitive advantages to learning a foreign language.   Many of these attributes are only apparent in people who speak multiple languages regularly – if you haven’t spoken a foreign tongue since your A levels, your brain might not be reaping these bilingual benefits. However, people who begin language study in their adult lives can still achieve the same levels of fluency as a young learner, and still reap the same mental benefits, too.

You become smarter

Speaking a foreign language improves the functionality of your brain by challenging it to recognise, negotiate meaning, and communicate in different language systems. This skill boosts your ability to negotiate meaning in other problem-solving tasks as well.

Students who study foreign languages tend to score better on standardised tests than their monolingual peers, particularly in the categories of maths, reading, and vocabulary.

Read more

Look Up #4

Look Up #4

Great Big Story

 

The collared aracari is a toucan native to the tropical rainforests of Central and South America. Bright plumage and large colorful bills give these small birds a standout color palette. At just over a foot in length, the collared aracari can weigh up to 10 ounces, but most of that size comes from its bill. Sadly, their population has been decreasing due to deforestation and hunting for the pet trade.

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • Native to the Tropical Rainforests
  • A gorgeous rainbow of colors
  • The most distinct feature
  • The upper part
  • Reach just over a foot long and weigh up to 10 ounces
  • They mainly eat fruit but occasionally feed on small insects
  • Their population has been decreasing
  • A combination of deforestation and hunting for the pet trade
 

 

Look Up #3

Look Up #3

Lab of Ornithology

 

In order to fly at peak performance, birds must carefully maintain their feathers. This means removing dirt, excess oil, and parasites. Birds do this by running their bill from the base of a feather to the tip, a process known as preening. In addition to removing debris, preening also realigns feathers, improving their aerodynamic performance. Read more HERE

 [All about birds]

 

Thousands of years and infinite inspiration

Thousands of years and infinite inspiration

[Google Arts and Culture]

Explore The Art of Chinese Crafts  HERE

 

 

Make something that does something

Make something that does something

[Little Bits]

 

WHAT IS  LITTLEBITS?


LittleBits makes a platform of easy-to-use electronic building blocks empowering everyone to create inventions, large and small.

We set out to reinvent screen time. We succeeded. Announcing the new Gizmos & Gadgets Kit 2nd Edition, available now. It’s the first kit with Bluetooth wireless technology, allowing kids to build inventions AND control them with a smart device. Turn kids’ screen-time addiction into a passion for hands-on inventing, problem-solving and creativity.

Read More HERE

Visit their online shop HERE

 

 

Lara made my life brighter

Lara made my life brighter

 [Lara Guide Dogs]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • Tackles the streets
  • A guide dog
  • The Visually impaired
  • Bumping into obstacles
  • The change was so radical
  • Teaching orientation and mobility to blind people
  • To live autonomously
  • A new concept
  • If they are treated with respect

Read more @ Lara Guide-Dog School

Eating breakfast with giraffes

Eating breakfast with giraffes

 [Seeker Stories]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • A split second
  • A man-eater
  • It messes with your sense of scale
  • A conservation biologist
  • A free roaming sanctuary
  • It was modeled on a Scottish hunting lodge
  • It became involved in giraffe conservation
  • A breeding program
  • To help fund the project the owners run a hotel
  • Up-close and personal
  • Soulful creatures
  • You really get a sense of that when you are up-close
  • 9 different sub species of giraffes
  • They are being poached out of existence for their tusks and for their horns
  • Highly endangered
  • Their  numbers have plummeted in recent years
  • Snap a shot
  • Downloaded my photos
  • Coming back year after year
  • Add this to your bucket list
More of Robin Moore’s photos  :  Robin Moore
Visit Giraffe Manor  : Giraffe Manor 
lexical chunks – engvid- videos for the classroom
The beautiful, the dangerous, the endangered. Up Close

The beautiful, the dangerous, the endangered. Up Close

[Google Arts and Culture]

Explore a project  HERE

 

 

“Creativity takes courage” Henri Matisse

“Creativity takes courage” Henri Matisse

[Google Arts and Culture]

Explore a project  HERE

 

 

I didn’t do my homework because…

I didn’t do my homework because…

[The Story Book Factory]

More Stories

 

An interesting article from Good Schools on homework  : 

There’s a long-running debate on the benefits of homework. The purpose of homework is to bridge the gap between children’s learning at school and at home, but just how relevant is it to the modern generation? We cover the advantages and disadvantages of homework below.

Advantages

  • Children develop time management and study skills: Homework sets children up to manage their time and plan out study schedules, which are very useful skills to have when they enter senior high school years, tertiary study and eventually the workforce. Completing homework early in the schooling years ensures that it becomes a habit — not an inconvenience.
     
  • Students can engage with their studies: Even with the whole day spent at school, allocated class time is not always sufficient when it comes to engaging students with their school work. Setting homework allows students to revise content learnt during the day with a fresh set of eyes and a clear head, away from their friends and other schoolyard distractions. This also provides parents with an opportunity to get involved in their child’s school work, providing assistance and additional insight when needed.

Read more