Where there’s a will, there’s a way #7

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #7

 

[Primitive Technology]

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Have you ever been on a safari ? Sunrise game drive LIVE from Africa 

Have you ever been on a safari ? Sunrise game drive LIVE from Africa 

 

#safarilive

Jump on the back and join a LIVE African Safari. Twice a day our expert guides invite you to come along and drive through the African bush in search of the Big Five as well as smaller animals.

Interact with your ranger by asking questions through #safarilive on Twitter or via the chat stream to the right of the feed on YouTube.

UPDATE: As of Tuesday, 1 August:
The Sunrise drive runs from 06:00 – 09:00 local time, which means start times of 00:00 EDT, 21:00 PDT, 05:00 in the UK, 06:00 in Central Europe (Summer), and 14:00 Sydney time.
Our Sunset Safari runs from 15:00 – 18:00 local time, which means start times of 09:00 EDT, 06:00 PDT, 14:00 in the UK, 15:00 in Central Europe (Summer), and 23:00 Sydney time.

When safariLIVE isn’t live, you can view the feed from the Djuma Waterhole camera, from the heart of Djuma Private Game Reserve in the Sabi Sand/greater Kruger National Park area.

READ MORE

Look up #11

Look up #11

[LabofOrnithology]

Bird parents build nests of all different shapes and sizes to keep their young safe and warm. Bald Eagles, for example, build massive structures out of twigs that can be over 5 feet in diameter. Hummingbirds, such as this Cuban Emerald have a much more discreet approach. The cup-shaped nests they construct out of materials such as leaves and spiderwebs are only slightly bigger than a quarter and typically house two eggs weighing less than a gram a piece.

Make the world a better place

Make the world a better place

[magical quote]

“What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.” – Nelson Mandela

What is Mandela Day?

Nelson Mandela International Day commemorates the lifetime of service Nelson Mandela gave to South Africa and the world. It was launched on his birthday, 18 July, in 2009 via a unanimous decision by the UN General Assembly.

“It is in your hands to make of the world a better place,” he said a year earlier, calling on the younger generation to take up this task.

Mandela Day calls on us all, every day, to make the world a better place. Each year on 18 July we look back on what has been done, and forward to what will be done

Making every day a Mandela Day celebrates Madiba’s life and legacy in a sustainable way that will bring about enduring change.  TAKE ACTION, INSPIRE CHANGE HERE

FREE RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS HERE

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #6

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #6

[Primitive Technology]

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #5

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #5

[Primitive Technology]

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Look Up #9

Look Up #9

Great Big Story

 

“With a wingspan up to 10 feet in length, the mighty Andean condor is one of the largest flying birds in the world. Found throughout the Andes Mountains, the condor is a national symbol for many South American countries. This massive bird has a hairless head, which will change color depending on its emotional state. Though the condor can live up to 70 years, its population is in decline, largely due to the destruction of its natural habitat” [Great big Story]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • With wings that spread up to 10ft apart
  • One of the largest flying birds in the world
  • Found throughout the Andes Mountains
  • A national symbol
  • Emotional state
  • Used to attract females
  • With some Condors living for more that 70 years
  • It is a scavenger bird
  • South American coast
  • The population is in decline
  • Due to the destruction of its natural habitat
  • Lead poisoning from carcasses shot by hunters
 

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #4

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #4

[Primitive Technology]

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Up close and personal

Up close and personal

  [Great Big story]

Every winter, Norwegian marine biologist Andreas B. Heide sails north in search of whales, especially orcas. He’s not just there to document these incredible creatures from the boat, however—he jumps in and swims right along with them. Orcas are some of the most powerful and intelligent predators on the planet, but by approaching them with respect and establishing trust, Andreas has been able to gain perspective on how they live, interact, and even play. His hope is to increase awareness for conservation efforts by documenting his up-close-and-personal interactions with these surprisingly gentle giants.

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • I was scared to death
  • But it chooses not to
  • I am a sailor, adventurer and marine biologist from Norway
  • It’s harsh and also tremendously beautiful
  • Nature at its very best
  • To make a documentary about orcas and whales in the wild
  • Observe them from a distance
  • They are gentle yet so fast
  • Once you’ve made eye contact with an orca there is no turning back
 
 
Where there’s a will, there’s a way #3

Where there’s a will, there’s a way #3

[Primitive Technology]

Read more about this project HERE

About Primitive Technology

“Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.”  READ MORE

 

Super delicious

Super delicious

 [tiger in a jar]
Beetroot Facts

Beetroot is herbaceous plant that belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. This plant originates from India, Mediterranean areas and Atlantic coast of Europe, but it can be found all over the world today. Beetroot is cultivated mainly because of its high nutritional value. Chemical compounds isolated from beetroot are used in medicine, chemical and food industry. Beetroot was used as ornamental plant in the past. Assyrians were using beetroot in Hanging Gardens of Babylon 800 years BC.
Did you know  :
Beetroot develops leafy stem that can grow 39 to 78 inches in height.
Beetroot has heart-shaped leaves. They are usually 2 to 8 inches long in wild plants and much longer in cultivated varieties.
Most people cultivate beetroot because of its edible root. It develops 55 to 65 days after planting of seed. Root is usually red to purple in color. Unlike other types of vegetables, root contains high quantities of sugar.
Beetroot develops small, green or reddish flowers that appear in dense spikes. Flowers are pollinated by wind.
Fruit of beetroot is called nutlet. It has hard structure and it is arranged in clusters.
Beetroot has high nutritional value. Besides high content of sugar, beetroot is rich source of vitamins B6 and B9 and minerals such as iron, magnesium and potassium.
Beetroot can be used raw, cooked or pickled. It is often used for salads, soups and as an ingredient of dishes made of meat. Beetroot can be also used for the manufacture of wine.
Leaves of beetroot are also edible. Fresh leaves taste like spinach.
Leaves of beetroot were used for binding of wounds in the ancient Greece. Beetroot was popular “mouth freshener” in the past. It was used to eliminate the smell of garlic. Latest medical experiments showed that beetroot lowers blood pressure and increases endurance in athletes. It also prevents development of liver diseases which result from protein deficiency, diabetes or alcohol abuse.
Beetroot juice was used as dye in the past. During the 19th century, women used beetroot for dyeing of hair.
Betain is a substance isolated from beetroot. It is responsible for the purple color of the root. This substance is used in food industry to improve color and taste of desserts, jams, ice-creams, jellies, tomato sauces and breakfast cereals.
Home-made lotion (produced by boiling the beetroot) can be used for the removal of dandruff.
Juice made of beetroot can be used instead of litmus paper to determine acidity or alkalinity of solution. One drop of beetroot juice changes its color in pink in acid solutions and into yellow in alkaline solution.
[soft schools]
How many languages are spoken in your country ?

How many languages are spoken in your country ?

 [World Economic Forum]

 

“Why learn a foreign language? Benefits of bilingualism

by Anne Merrit   at The Telegraph, 2013

Learning a foreign language is more than just a boost to your CV or handy for travelling. It will make you smarter, more decisive and even better at English, says Anne Merritt.

Physiological studies have found that speaking two or more languages is a great asset to the cognitive process. The brains of bilingual people operate differently than single language speakers, and these differences offer several mental benefits.

Below are seven cognitive advantages to learning a foreign language.   Many of these attributes are only apparent in people who speak multiple languages regularly – if you haven’t spoken a foreign tongue since your A levels, your brain might not be reaping these bilingual benefits. However, people who begin language study in their adult lives can still achieve the same levels of fluency as a young learner, and still reap the same mental benefits, too.

You become smarter

Speaking a foreign language improves the functionality of your brain by challenging it to recognise, negotiate meaning, and communicate in different language systems. This skill boosts your ability to negotiate meaning in other problem-solving tasks as well.

Students who study foreign languages tend to score better on standardised tests than their monolingual peers, particularly in the categories of maths, reading, and vocabulary.

Read more

Look Up #4

Look Up #4

Great Big Story

 

The collared aracari is a toucan native to the tropical rainforests of Central and South America. Bright plumage and large colorful bills give these small birds a standout color palette. At just over a foot in length, the collared aracari can weigh up to 10 ounces, but most of that size comes from its bill. Sadly, their population has been decreasing due to deforestation and hunting for the pet trade.

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • Native to the Tropical Rainforests
  • A gorgeous rainbow of colors
  • The most distinct feature
  • The upper part
  • Reach just over a foot long and weigh up to 10 ounces
  • They mainly eat fruit but occasionally feed on small insects
  • Their population has been decreasing
  • A combination of deforestation and hunting for the pet trade
 

 

Look Up #3

Look Up #3

Lab of Ornithology

 

In order to fly at peak performance, birds must carefully maintain their feathers. This means removing dirt, excess oil, and parasites. Birds do this by running their bill from the base of a feather to the tip, a process known as preening. In addition to removing debris, preening also realigns feathers, improving their aerodynamic performance. Read more HERE

 [All about birds]