Weekly photo challenge – Numbers (3)

Weekly photo challenge – Numbers (3)

Number (3_

photography by :  vocabulary in chunks

Weighing devices are among man’s most important inventions. The earliest civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Indus Valley had uniform systems of weights and measures. The history of commerce can be traced back to these systems. Balances were in use in Mesopotamia as early as 4000 BC. For modern man, weighing and measuring play an essential role in our daily lives. Shortly after birth we are weighed, and from that point on, our bodies, the food we eat and all the products we use are weighed and measured at some stage in their development.

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scale (noun) weighing instrument, early 15c.; earlier “pan of a balance” (late 14c.); earlier still “drinking cup” (c. 1200), from Old Norse skal “bowl, drinking cup,” in plural, “weighing scale” from a noun derivative of Proto-Germanic *skæla “split, divide” (source also of Old Norse skel “shell,” Old English scealu, Old Saxon skala “a bowl (to drink from),” Old High German scala, German Schale “a bowl, dish, cup,” Middle Dutch scale, Dutch schaal “drinking cup, bowl, shell, scale of a balance”), from PIE root *skel- (1) “to cut” (see scale (n.1)).

The connecting sense seems to be of half of a bivalve (“split”) shell used as a drinking cup or a pan for weighing. But according to Paulus Diaconus the “drinking cup” sense originated from a supposed custom of making goblets from skulls (see skull). Related: Scales. This, as a name for the zodiac constellation Libra, is attested in English from 1630s.

[Etymonline.com]
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Numbers
Weekly photo challenge – Numbers (2)

Weekly photo challenge – Numbers (2)

photography by :  vocabulary in chunks

Number Proverbs and Sayings :

Once bitten, twice shy. After an unpleasant experience, people are careful to avoid something similar.
One father is (worth) more than a hundred schoolmasters. A teacher cannot replace a father. A child is raised by a father and taught by a teacher.
One good turn deserves another. You should be helpful to someone who helps you.
Opportunity seldom knocks twice Don’t miss opportunities that come along.
One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. What is useless to one person could be valuable to another.
Two wrongs don’t make a right. It is wrong to harm someone because they have harmed you.
Opportunity seldom knocks twice.

Don’t miss opportunities that come along.

   
               source : Learn English Today
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Numbers
Weekly photo challenge – Numbers

Weekly photo challenge – Numbers

Number

photography by :  vocabulary in chunks

Number Idioms :

go fifty-fifty (on something)

  •     to divide the cost of something in half

    I decided to go fifty-fifty on a new camera with my friend.

it takes two to tango

  •     if a problem or an argument involve two people then both people are responsible for the problem

    It takes two to tango and my friend should not blame me for all of our problems.

nine times out of ten

  •     almost always

    Nine times out of ten a small computer problem can be easily fixed.

on cloud nine

  •     very happy about something

    My sister has been on cloud nine since she won the money in the contest.

split (something) fifty-fifty

  •     to split or divide something into two equal parts

    We split the profits from our business fifty-fifty.

look like a million dollars

  •     look very good

    My mother looked like a million dollars when she left the hospital.

source : Idiom connection
In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge Numbers

 

Some secrets are meant to be shared

Some secrets are meant to be shared

[Lonely Planet]

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • I love travelling around Greece
  • Off the beaten track
  • Tell people about it
  • Lonely Planet awards the best travel destinations in Europe for the upcoming year
  • This year it’s going to be the Peloponnese
  • It’s got a huge array of things
  • “Filoxenia”, the traditional Greek welcoming attitude
  • The full spectrum of what Greece has to offer
  • Truly forgotten regions of Greece
  • The site of the original Olympic games
  • The stadium where the athletes used to compete
  • Shipwreck diving
  • Go down these country lanes
  • Wine regions in Greece
  • Many are experimental and organic others are very very traditional
  • A great place to taste wine
  • The top region in Europe for 2016
  • It really deserves the recognition
  • Some secrets are meant to be shared

Lonely Planet’s Best in Europe 2016

  1. Peloponnese, Greece
  2. Aarhus, Denmark
  3. Venice, Italy
  4. The Dordogne, France
  5. Lviv, Ukraine
  6. Warwickshire, England
  7. Extremadura, Spain
  8. East Coast Tenerife, Canary Islands
  9. Texel, the Netherlands
  10. Northern Dalmatia, Croatia

The Peloponnese, Greece

Travellers to Greece tend to flock to the myriad islands or marvel at the iconic Acropolis, but one of the country’s most diverse, vibrant regions is often forgotten: the Peloponnese. It remains an affordable enclave of magnificent ancient sites like Olympia, Mycenae and Mystras, which are scattered across a rich landscape of stone villages, teal seas and snow-capped mountains.

2016 brings the chance to hike the Peloponnese’s new Menalon trail or take a tipple in the Nemean wine region, with its vintages gaining prominence around the globe. You can dive shipwrecks off the Navarino coast or visit the wild and remote Mani, home to ancient stone towers converted into boutique luxury lodgings. Beautiful Nafplio blends contemporary art with atmospheric architecture and classic town squares, ideal for a long, lazy lunch.

Now more than ever the Peloponnese is the perfect destination for absorbing traditional Greek life, compelling history and inspiring landscapes. Download your free PDF guide to the Peloponnese to find out for yourself.

Download the Free PDF guide to the Peloponnese

[Lonely Planet]