Home is where the nest is

Home is where the nest is

 

He just might be the biggest bluebird landlord in Idaho. Al Larson has built and placed more than 350 wooden nest boxes throughout the state’s southwest. The birdwatcher started the project in the late 1970s after reading how important the shelters are to the survival of bluebirds. Today, at the age of 97, he is still at it. Larson monitors the little houses to record vital data about the number of eggs and nestlings. To date, Larson has helped fledge over 40,000 bluebirds.

 

Vocabulary chunks to learn from video :

 

  • I am attracted to the bluebirds because of  their beauty
  • I’m 97 years old or young
  • Over 40.000 nestlings
  • I’m a birdwatcher
  • When I retired in the late 70’s
  • Their population has been declining
  • A nest box
  • I should put up more boxes
  • I came up with the solution
  • As simply as possible
  • With just 4 sides
  • More than 350 nest boxes out
  • I monitor the boxes regularly
  • The nesting cycle
  • To see if my colour matches the sky
  • I’m gratified to know that I’ve helped the bluebirds increase their population
  • I’ve inspired many many  other people to help other creatures as well
  • My message is you’ve got to be active if  you’re going to get old
  • So think about the future
  • Plan ahead

How to mae a simple bird house

 

Where do you store your winter food supply ?

Where do you store your winter food supply ?

LabofOrnithology

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • One of the most interesting birds that I have every photographed is Acorn Woodpecker
  • I found a population of woodpeckers in a Suburban Park, in Southern California
  • Thousands and thousands of holes in it
  • They are among the busiest birds
  • This is where they store their winter food supply
  • It’s a tree that has been used over the generations, multi generations
  • We don’t drill them all at once
  • Each winter they drill a few more
  • And add some more acorns to them
  • That makes Acorn Woodpeckers pretty special in the bird world
  • They’ve got glossy blue-black back
  • They’ve got red and pale yellow and black markings around their heads and faces
  • Their eyes really stand out
  • You can tell the males from the females
  • They’re highly social birds
  • They live in social groups year round, up to a dozen individuals or more
  • Dramatic and very wonderful wing-spread display
  • I really like to go watch them and photograph them
The Birds of Paradise

The Birds of Paradise

Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :

  • They transform themselves into something that you’ve never seen before
  • They are unlike any creatures on earth
  • Most outstanding phenomena ever witnessed
  • Evolutionary Biologist
  • Wildlife photographer
  • 39 Species of these miraculous birds
  • In an attempt to comprehend their secrets
  • How did that come to be
  • Exceptional Beauty
  • One of nature’s most extraordinary hidden wonders

Some interesting facts :

Males use their voices to broadcast their location and entice distant females to come and look. When females approach, males turn on the visuals, which often come with their own more intimate sounds.

A map of New Guinea

New Guinea

Explore more @ Birds of Paradise Project 

Free lesson plans can be found HERE

Free Webinars can be found HERE 

Listen #3 – The last song

Listen #3 – The last song

Hashem Al-ghaili

The last of the Hawaiian ‘oos’ this small bird is now presumed to be Extinct following no further sightings since 1985 READ MORE

Learn more HERE

FREE Education resources for teachers HERE

Every bird counts

Every bird counts

[labofornithology]

Global tools for birders, critical data for science

Record the birds you see
Keep track of your bird lists
Explore dynamic maps and graphs
Share your sightings and join the eBird community
Contribute to science and conservation

Explore a region HERE

Read more at eBird  HERE

Vocabulary chunks to learn from video :

• Put them all in one place
• We would transform birding
• Science and conservation
• Make them available to educators
• Where you are birding
• It’s grown
• To understand the movements and needs of birds at a global scale
• The best birding hotspots
• Generate species distribution channels
• Better conservation strategies
• Opening the door to the future of better bird conservation
• And this is just the beginning
• A free open access system
• Easy to use, fun and rewarding
• Get started all for free
• A global team of people
• Share your passion for birds
• Be a part of it

Birdwatching – How to attract birds to your garden

Birdwatching – How to attract birds to your garden

 

[The Guardian]

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

We’re all lined up with our binoculars looking

We’ll get the guide books out

There’s just a real buzz

There’s a fantastic diversity of wild life around us

This is the world that we live in

We should be interacting with it and connecting with it a little bit more

Our species count at the moment is 63

Your classic garden birds

With a big, resplendent (shining brightly) orange chest, lovely

They are brightly colored.. not brown.. really easy to spot

Bird watching is a very accessible pastime

It’s entertaining, it’s educational, it’s fun and its free

If you want to encourage birds into your garden all you need to do is put out your bird feeders

It’s a very easy meal… It’s like a take away

Sunflowers seeds  and peanuts will bring in a lot of species

Get a mixture of seed, you can put all sorts of things

Squidge it into a yogurt pot

Let it set for half an hour and then hang it out

Energy rich food for the birds

They want to come in, grab some food and then retreat

Many bird species feed on insects

Getting people connected with nature

If you get people bird watching they will be hooked for life

Look Up #8

Look Up #8

Lab of Ornithology

 

Birds-of-Paradise sport some of the strangest feathers in the bird world. The male King-of-Saxony takes the cake with stiff ornamental feathers (up to twice the male’s body length) sprouting from the top of his head. He also has a piercing call that sounds anything but bird-like. Filmed by Tim Laman near Tari Gap in November of 2010.  Explore the Birds of Paradise Project HERE

Free lesson plans HERE

Free Teaching Resources HERE

A map of New Guinea

New Guinea

 

 

Look Up #2

Look Up #2

Lab of Ornithology

 

The feathers on this hummingbird’s throat are surprising. One minute they’re bright red, the next, black. This is known as iridescence, a common, showy feature of many birds’ plumages, from hummingbirds to starlings to jays to ducks. Iridescence doesn’t exist as a pigment—it is a structural color created by light striking the feathers. In each iridescent feather, keratin, melanin, and air are arranged in such a way that the appearance of the feather changes at different viewing angles.

 [All about birds]

 

Look Up

Look Up

Lab of Ornithology

 

The Wire-tailed Manakin’s dance may be one of the most impressive in the bird world, but it can’t be performed on just any dance floor. Like many other species with elaborate displays, the male very carefully selects his dance site relative to the sites of other males in the area. Together these sites are known as an exploded lek. Each male picks a location that is easily visible to females and then carefully maintains it, clearing away anything that might obscure the view or get in the way of his performance. 

 [All about birds]