A place of miracles

A place of miracles

singita.com
Vocabulary chunks to learn after watching the video :
  • Singita’s philosophy is to protect large tracks of land for future generations
  • To preserve and to protect them
  • Nature has evolved over millions and millions of years
  • One of the golden rules in conservation management is that you can’t reverse a process in one day
  • You are seeing business today being run with a much shorter time frame
  • With less strategic thinking than ever before
  • We have built this business block by block
  • To ensure that nature is left to itself, that man does not interfere
  • We have to intervene very quickly, to ensure that areas are protected for the long-term
  • It so incredibly authentic to come to Africa
  • People say to me that they go home looking at life very differently
  • It impacts on you on a spiritual basis, on a physical basis, on a sensory basis
  • There is a  sense of well-being
  • We will only take on new projects if they are as good, if not better, than our existing product offering
  • We look for these painstakingly
  • They are rare they are difficult to find
  • We are building a legacy
  • And that legacy we hope will endure for a long time
A map of the region :

Map of Singita

For further information visit Singita HERE
Teaching Lexical Chunks

Teaching Lexical Chunks

 “A Lexical Chunk is a unit of language which is made up of two or more words.

Here are a few examples of lexical chunks :

Good morning.
Nice to see you!
What’s the time?

Other lexical chunks can include phrasal verbs‏‎, idioms, collocation‏‎s and so on.

Lexical chunks are the common coinage of English. They’re the bread and butter, the everyday and the mundane. They’re the reliable standards around which we can hang poetic and emotive language.

Read more

What are Language Chunks?

What are Language Chunks?

Language chunks are definitely one of the main ingredients of successful transition to the advanced levels of English. They’re what sets apart one language from the other, what makes each language distinct and unique. Noticing language chunks is a skill that needs to be well-developed by the intermediate level of English. If a student is unable to recognize common phrases and word combinations, s/he’ll stay at his/her current level and will never make it to the advanced stages.
 
The following are commonly referred to as language chunks :
Collocations are phrases that consist of words that recurrently co-occur together (derived from Latin locare ‘to locate’ and cum ‘together; introduced in 30s by John R. Frith).
 
dual citizenship but double occupancy
above zero but over 10 years (experience)
shipwreck but car accident
cut
hair but trim hedge
other terminology: 
‘prefabricated chunks’, ‘phraseological units’, ‘multi-word combinations’
 
Idioms are expressions which meaning cannot be understood from the meanings of its component parts (derived from Latin ‘idioma’ – special property).

Read more

Create your own style

Create your own style

  [Birchbox Man]

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • Slightly wet
  • Towel-dried hair
  • A dime sized amount
  • Work it in from roots
  • Once every 2 to 3 days
  • Rinse it on other days to keep it healthy
  • Dry Shampoo absorbs oils
  • On in-between shampoo days
  • For added volume use a comb and blow dryer
  • One for hold and one for texture
  • Soft beach like texture

 

Bird listening or bird watching?

Bird listening or bird watching?

  [The Brain Scoop]

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • Bird calls of Amazonia
  • An Ornithologist
  • We follow the pre-opened trail
  • We do this at a slow pace
  • Keep in mind
  • The most complex landscape in the world
  • Recording equipment
  • A field guide
  • I do a lot of recordings, primarily for learning
  • The most indicative like rainforest bird, noise
  • Bird watching in real-time
  • Telling insects from birds
  • Bird like calls
  • Different species
  • Haven’t been explored that deeply
  • We can upload them on systems online
  • A cacophony of sounds
  • A flock of ant birds following a swarm of army ants
  • A little over an hour
  • They should call it bird listening not bird watching

Amazonia Map

As an Ornithologist, you could be involved in:

  • fieldwork and research
  • conservation and habitat management
  • consultancy
  • education
  • campaigning and policy development.

Your work would vary depending on the particular job, but typically you’ll:

  • conduct surveys
  • monitor bird species in a particular habitat
  • track bird movements and biological processes
  • collect, analyse and evaluate data
  • prepare reports, management plans and presentations.

To be an ornithologist you should have:

  • a keen interest in birds and their habitats
  • an accurate and methodical approach to surveying, recording and reporting
  • enthusiasm about wildlife conservation
  • good analytical and mathematical skills
  • the ability to work alone or as part of a team
  • good written and spoken communication skills
  • the ability to produce clear reports
  • a willingness to work flexibly
  • IT skills.

You could be employed as an ornithologist by a number of organisations, including:

  • observatories
  • ringing stations
  • nature reserves
  • local authorities
  • conservation charities, including international projects
  • wildlife trusts
  • ecological consultancies conservation organisations
[National Career Service ]

 

Beet Cake

Beet Cake

 [tiger in a jar]
Beetroot Facts

Beetroot is herbaceous plant that belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. This plant originates from India, Mediterranean areas and Atlantic coast of Europe, but it can be found all over the world today. Beetroot is cultivated mainly because of its high nutritional value. Chemical compounds isolated from beetroot are used in medicine, chemical and food industry. Beetroot was used as ornamental plant in the past. Assyrians were using beetroot in Hanging Gardens of Babylon 800 years BC.
Interesting Beetroot Facts:
Beetroot develops leafy stem that can grow 39 to 78 inches in height.
Beetroot has heart-shaped leaves. They are usually 2 to 8 inches long in wild plants and much longer in cultivated varieties.
Most people cultivate beetroot because of its edible root. It develops 55 to 65 days after planting of seed. Root is usually red to purple in color. Unlike other types of vegetables, root contains high quantities of sugar.
Beetroot develops small, green or reddish flowers that appear in dense spikes. Flowers are pollinated by wind.
Fruit of beetroot is called nutlet. It has hard structure and it is arranged in clusters.
Beetroot has high nutritional value. Besides high content of sugar, beetroot is rich source of vitamins B6 and B9 and minerals such as iron, magnesium and potassium.
Beetroot can be used raw, cooked or pickled. It is often used for salads, soups and as an ingredient of dishes made of meat. Beetroot can be also used for the manufacture of wine.
Leaves of beetroot are also edible. Fresh leaves taste like spinach.
Leaves of beetroot were used for binding of wounds in the ancient Greece. Beetroot was popular “mouth freshener” in the past. It was used to eliminate the smell of garlic. Latest medical experiments showed that beetroot lowers blood pressure and increases endurance in athletes. It also prevents development of liver diseases which result from protein deficiency, diabetes or alcohol abuse.
Beetroot juice was used as dye in the past. During the 19th century, women used beetroot for dyeing of hair.
Betain is a substance isolated from beetroot. It is responsible for the purple color of the root. This substance is used in food industry to improve color and taste of desserts, jams, ice-creams, jellies, tomato sauces and breakfast cereals.
Home-made lotion (produced by boiling the beetroot) can be used for the removal of dandruff.
Juice made of beetroot can be used instead of litmus paper to determine acidity or alkalinity of solution. One drop of beetroot juice changes its color in pink in acid solutions and into yellow in alkaline solution.
[soft schools]
One woman, four camels and 1700 miles

One woman, four camels and 1700 miles

Watch the following video :

 [BBC World Service]

Vocabulary to learn after watching the video :

  • She decided to set off on this strange journey
  • The Australian outback
  • People talk about the hardship of what she faced out there
  • She talks about the wonder of it
  • Being alone, the solitude, seeing more stars you could possibly imagine at night
  • Learning to trust your own instincts
  • A Heroic person
  • She has this very unusual attraction towards the things that frighten her
  • The camels seem to respond to her so well
  • They were like 2000 pound dogs
  • They steal food from her
  • They are one person animals